From My Carolina Home

Quilting, cooking, reading books, gardening, crafting, sewing, photography and more


46 Comments

Omiyage

Gift giving is something I really enjoy.  Seeing someone’s face as they receive a little remembrance as a surprise is fun.  In the Japanese tradition of Omiyage, in past times, gifts were given to the lords of the lands for protection with many rules on the gift itself down to how it was wrapped and even the manner presented.  The gift needed to be presented with both hands, with an apology for the trivial nature of the gift no matter how expensive or extravagant.  Recipients were to demur and be persuaded to accept it.  In modern times, gifts are given to friends and family as a show of respect, with relatively few guidelines.  The most common Omiyage is given by travelers, which is why many believe the word translates to ‘souvenir’, but this is not really correct.  Gifts are brought back from the traveler to present to coworkers in the case of a business trip, or vacation gifts to family and friends, mainly of food items.  This can be a real burden when you work with a lot of people!  Visitors from far away places bring gifts to their hosts of things from their homeland, again particularly edibles.  In her book, Omiyage, Kumiko Sudo blends the Japanese tradition with the joy of handmade into small gifts made with scraps.  Luxurious fabrics left over from kimonos are particularly good.  This little crane is a pincushion from the book, made with a scrap left over from my Sakura Tsuki quilt.  Cranes are symbols of longevity and good luck, and giving a gift of a handmade crane wishes the recipient happiness and long life.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

I have two projects to share with you today, both original ideas for gifts you can make.  The first one is one I have shown before, my sunglasses case, this time in Oriental fabric.  I have an ulterior motive for showing you this again, and I’ll reveal that at the end of the post.  So, to begin, I’ll make two of these at once, cutting two focus fabrics and two lining fabrics 10-inches x 9 inches.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Sew the two fabrics right sides together with batting, turn, and then topstitch.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Apply velcro as outlined in the Sunglasses Case post.  Fold up the bottom and topstitch.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Very quickly, two sunglasses cases.  One I did a bit of quilting on, the other I left plain.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Second project, an easy cosmetic case.  The idea occurred to me to do it in the a similar manner as the sunglasses case to make the project much simpler and easier than doing one with a zipper.  So, I began by figuring out the right size, and cut a focus fabric and a lining fabric 10-inches wide x 15-inches long.  I cut a bit of batting the same size.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Layer batting, then lining right side up, then focus fabric right side down.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Sew around the edge, through all three layers, leaving a 3-4 inch opening for turning.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Clip the corners to reduce bulk.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Reaching between the lining and focus fabric, turn right sides out.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

I use a chopstick to poke out the corners to a nice point.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Press the piece to sharpen the edges and the corners.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Take special care over the opening to ensure it is in line with an adequate seam allowance inside.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Topstitch all the way around to close the opening, and finish off the edges.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Now, on the lining side, stitch an 8-inch piece of velcro centered at each short side.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

The velcro will not extend to the edge of the piece, leaving room to sew the bag closed.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Press the velcro together, ensuring it matches up on the side edges.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Topstitch the sides closed along the previous line of topstitching.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

All done, a simple bag, easy and fast.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Now you have a pretty matched set of cosmetic case and sunglasses case, which brings me to the ulterior motive.  Last summer we worked together to make the spa bags for Safelight.  I received a recent email from the new director saying that the bags were almost gone.  They have been placing them on the bed for new residents to have something to ease their difficult transition.  Last time, many readers asked if there was something that could be sewn, and this time there is.  I plan to do a bag project later in the spring that will have sunglasses as one of the goodies inside.  I thought it would be wonderful to do matching sunglasses cases with cosmetics cases for each bag.  Omiyage for the residents of Safelight.  I’ll be collecting them over the next two months or so, so you can slot the quick project in your schedule if you would like to help.  Any fabric is fine, doesn’t have to be Asian inspired.  Download an abbreviated pattern pdf with both projects along with my address for mailing – Omiyage for Safelight  And, yes, we’ll be doing cards and donations for the bags later.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

The inspiration for these projects came from several books by Kumiko Sudo, and her small handmade projects are both charming and interesting using beautiful fabrics and new techniques.  These are affiliate links for your convenience – Omiyage, Kokoro no Te, Folded Flowers, Flower Origami.  I’ll be getting to projects in fabric folding and origami later, I just haven’t had time to explore that and do a new design yet.

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

Now for the fun part, how about a giveaway!!!  Aurifil is providing an East Meets West thread pack to support this series on Japanese and Asian inspired posts.  Just look at those gorgeous, vibrant colors.  Enter using the Rafflecopter link below!  Entries accepted worldwide!!

Rafflecopter Giveaway Aurifil Thread Collection East Meets West

What are you sewing now?  Can you make a set of cases for Safelight?

Fat Quarter Shop Daily Flash Sale

New Project Kits on Sale at Craftsy – Click HERE

P1060467

Thank you!

Omiyage at From My Carolina Home

 

Sharing

Freemotion by the River

Advertisements


30 Comments

Travel Pillow Case

One thing that I do not like about traveling is hotel pillows.  For some reason most hotels have gone to all down pillows, which to me are very uncomfortable.  They go flat in a hurry, and I need the support for my neck to last all night.  So, I started asking for acrylic or polyester pillows when I check in, but even this is a problem as many hotels no longer even have those for the asking.  A couple of years ago, I began taking my own pillow with me on driving trips after I was forced to go to a discount store and buy a pillow while out of town just so I could sleep.  Checking the room as we were checking out, I completely overlooked it as it had a white pillowcase just like all the others in the room and didn’t stand out at all.  So I left a brand new pillow behind.  I decided to fix that last year with a pillowcase that couldn’t be overlooked.  I really liked this rose print, and it was the perfect size for the case.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

I used the roll-up method, simple and no exposed unfinished seams and no hand work.  I’m sure most of you have seen these on the internet for years.  But for anyone who hasn’t seen this, here are the instructions.  Begin by cutting these pieces-

  • 27″ x width of fabric from selvedge to selvedge of the main fabric – the rose print here
  • 9″ x width of fabric from selvedge to selvedge of coordinating fabric for the cuff – dark green
  • 2″ x width of fabric from selvedge to selvedge strip of solid fabric for accent strip – gold print

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Press the accent strip in half lengthwise to make a 1″ folded strip with the raw edges together.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Lay your fabrics in this order.  The cuff print on the bottom, flat and face up with the selvedges on the sides and the raw edge at the top.  Then place the main focus fabric also face up matching one of the WOF raw edges.  Roll up the other end so it is small enough to work around. Place the trim on top, raw edges meeting.  All selvedge edges will be on the sides, and may not be exactly the same width.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Now bring the bottom edge of the cuff print up to the top, over the roll of focus fabric, meeting the raw edges.  You now have 5 edges meeting at the top.  The other raw edge of the focus fabric is rolled up inside it.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Pin in place.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Sew a single line of stitching through all five layers.  You can use a serger if you wish, and I did just to keep it in good working order.  It isn’t necessary, as all the raw edges will eventually be covered.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Pull the focus fabric out one end to turn the whole assembly right side out.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

If you have selvedge edges left on as I did, trim them off at this time.  Note the cuff seam is now finished on both sides.  This is the inside of the pillowcase.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

The accent is a flange on the right side (outside).

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Now, sew a French seam to finish the case.  Place fabric WRONG sides together, folding the case to meet the sides of the cuff and main focus fabrics, and pin to hold the flange straight.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Sew or serge a 1/4-inch seam.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Turn the case inside out to meet right sides together.  Sew the same seam again this time at 1/2-inch, enclosing the raw edges of the previous seam.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

Do the same French Seam across the bottom and you are done.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

That’s it, so simple.  To get a printable pattern, click on my affiliate Craftsy Link – Pillowcase Tutorial.  There is a downloadable free pdf in the tutorial.

Craftsy.com
Happy Cloud Quilt Batting by Fat Quarter Shop

Today is the last day for this Notion of the Month at Fat Quarter Shop – Quilt Dots.

Now, I cannot help but see my pillow on any hotel bed.  I haven’t left it behind since I made this pillowcase.

Travel Pillow Case at From My Carolina Home

These quick pillowcases make wonderful quilt covers too, and can be made any size you like.  For Queen or King size, just cut the focus fabric longer than the 27-inches of a standard pillow (whatever your pillow needs), the width of the fabric is still the same, and the other pieces would also be the same.  Have you done these before, or is this a new idea for you?


12 Comments

Quilted Sunglasses Case

One thing that always a problem is keeping my sunglasses scratch free.  I often have used drawstring bags, or quilted ones where the glasses slide in one end.  Those are easy to make, but the problem is the glasses will not stay inside.  They end up either sticking out the end,  or coming out altogether inside my purse.  So, the only thing to do is to make a new pattern for one that will hold the glasses inside.  Now, I like big sunglasses, ones that will give me a lot of protection both in front and partially around the sides, and they have to have a bit of glam or bling with rhinestones or something cute.  My friend Bonnie calls these my Jackie O glasses. LOL!!

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

To get started, I pulled out two coordinating purple fabrics to make the case.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Fabric and notion requirements –

Two pieces of fabric 10-inches x 9-inches.
One piece of scrap batting 8-1/4-inches x 9-1/4-inches
One piece of velcro 4-inches in length, both hook and loop sides

Start by putting the two pieces of fabric right sides together and sew around the edge with 1/4-inch allowance, leaving an opening for turning.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Clip corners. Turn right side out pushing the corners out sharply. Press.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

With a tool like a chopstick, insert batting, using tool to smooth out the batting flat inside the bag.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Topstitch 1/4 inch from the edge all the way around, catching the opening for turning.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Quilt simply with cross-hatching, or wavy lines.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

I used wavy lines in both directions, about 2-1/2 inches apart.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

On the outside fabric, stitch one side of the velcro near a short edge about 2-1/2-inches from the sides (centered).

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Position the other side of the velcro on the inside fabric near the edge and stitch down.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Fold the bottom edge up 3-1/2 inches.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Top-stitch the sides.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Finished, and ready to use.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Closed up, the velcro will hold the glasses inside.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Larger and longer than most, this case will hold those larger size shades.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Nicely padded with the quilting, it will keep the glasses scratch free.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Closed with the glasses inside.

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

You can make smaller ones for your reading glasses too.  Just measure the length of your glasses and add one inch.  Now I have a matched set!

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

Linking up with the Bag It! event on Elm Street Quilts.

This simple design can be used for scissors keepers too, or anything else you want to carry and have remain inside the case.  I think I’ll make another one for Autumn!

My blog is about a variety of topics, quilting and sewing, crafting and cooking, reading and travel, mountain living and gardening, and more.  You can follow my blog in several ways, see the sidebar for email sign up or blog-reader links (smart phone users scroll down past the comments).  I have lots of free patterns for quilters, mystery quilt alongs, holiday quilt alongs, and seasonal events with giveaways.  Please follow me for all the fun!  Speaking of Autumn, my Autumn Jubilee event is coming up in October, a whole month of projects, a quilt along, a sew along, crafting projects, tablescapes, recipes and giveaways.

Fat Quarter Shop Daily Flash Sale

(Affiliate links.  Check out today’s Flash Sale! By clicking on the link and making a purchase, I may earn a small commission to help support the costs of my blog.  You can use your existing account with Fat Quarter Shop to shop.  Thank you for using my links!)

7th Annual Simple Whatnots Club from Fat Quarter Shop

What colors would you use to make your sunglasses case?

Sunglasses Case at From My Carolina Home

 


24 Comments

More Fun at the Fair

Going back to the the Expo Building at the State Fair while the judges tasted the offerings in the cooking competition, I wanted to search out the two quilts I hadn’t found on my previous visit, and get some better pictures.   Be My Carolina Neighbor was hanging with its second place ribbon.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

The Scrap Dance Two Step in black was entered into the wall hanging category and won a third place.

NC Mountain State Fair at From My Carolina Home

I was really thrilled to find that the pumpkin and leaf quilted table topper from last year’s Autumn Jubilee won a first place as well as a Judge’s Choice ribbon in the crafts division table linens category!! In the interest of full disclosure, almost half of my entries did not win anything. Competition is pretty fierce, and that makes the ribbons won even more special.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

I wanted to show you this extraordinary quilt.  It won Best of Show, a gorgeous fan quilt pieced and hand quilted by Willoree Risley.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

Here’s a close up of her outstanding work, ghosted fans that complete over four block in a Baptist Fan design with extra embellishment. This must have taken months to complete, something I just cannot do.  Unbelievably intricate and outstanding work!  Congratulations, Willoree, on a stunning quilt.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

I also want to let the quilter readers know, the Fat Quarter Shop is raising money for Hurricane Harvey relief with a special pattern called Healing Hearts.  Click on Fat Quarter Shop, hover over patterns/books and then click on the banner for Healing Hearts.  While you are there, check out the Flash Sale and the Precuts bargains to help you make your quilt.

Happy Cloud Quilt Batting by Fat Quarter Shop

(Affiliate links. By clicking on the link and making a purchase, I may earn a small commission to help support the costs of my blog.  You can use your existing account with Fat Quarter Shop to shop.  Thank you for using my links!)

Fat Quarter Shop's Notion of the Month Sale

In the photography category, one of my photos got a third place ribbon in the category of State Fair photos. Amazingly, this one was a last minute substitution for one I decided wasn’t that interesting. Good decision, wasn’t it!!

NC Mountain State Fair at From My Carolina Home

In the clothing category, my Jelly Roll Market Bag won a third place.  This is a free pattern I did for Moda, and is available for download at the Bake Shop.   Click on the sidebar link to get the pattern.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

There were more things to see and do every time we went. A street entertainer was playing a one-man band, with an assistant pulling his speakers behind. The Chicken and Waffle vendor is right behind him, and yes I did have one the first trip to the fair.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

The Davis building where the cooking competitions are held has all kinds of exhibits and vendors. The one on the dinosaurs was really impressive with animated figures.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

One last ribbon, this Moda project pillow won a second place in the Holiday Decorations category. I’ll show you how I embellished last year’s project when it gets a bit closer to the holidays.

NC Mountain State Fair 2017 at From My Carolina Home

Next time I’ll show you the first cooking competition, and share the recipe.  What are you working on now?


26 Comments

Let’s Talk About Pillows

When was the last time you bought yourself a new pillow for your bed? I asked this question of some friends recently, and their responses were much the same as mine – years.  We all know about dust mites, and keeping our bedding clean, vacuuming the mattress from time to time, but I’ll bet most of you, like me, don’t think about the pillows much.  Change the pillow cases, wash the covers, and wash the pillows if you can.  I have foam pillows which are next to impossible to wash, but I can put them in the dryer now on high heat for 15 minutes to kill the mites.  Problem is I forget to do that every three to six months as recommended.   Down pillows are the worst for growing mites, and it seems that the newer latex and memory foam is the best for keeping those colonies down.  There was a great sale at a local department store over the July 4th weekend, and I am sure that there will be good ones coming up for the next holiday. So think about getting yourself some new pillows.  Now, decide which of the old ones can go between your bed and the guest bed.  But, don’t throw them away, make these really super fast dog beds.  I cleaned the pillows as best I could in the mud sink with a brush and soapy water (they won’t do in my low water washer), dried them in the dryer to get them as fresh as possible.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

Then, I purchased some pillowcases at the thrift store for $1 each. I brought them home and washed them. Inserting a pillow, I simply topstitched the opening closed. Assembly time less than five minutes.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

Then, there was this fabric in the stash. I got it because of the light pink part, never opened it up to see the border print. Now it is in the ‘what was I thinking?’ pile.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

I put the pillow on the fabric and cut a piece large enough to cover it, folded it right sides together, then serged the sides. Sewing would work just as well, but I need to use the serger to keep it working well.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

The pillow was inserted, and the end was sewn shut by turning under the raw edge and topstitching.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

This took 15 minutes total. I don’t think the shelter dogs will care about the color.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

One of the pillowcases was a king size pillowcase in flannel with a large, thicker piece on the end. So, I cut that off to make the case a better size for the pillow.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

I turned the raw edge under….

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

and topstitched it just like the others. The flannel slid around a bit, so I pinned this edge.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

Donated to an outlying shelter that has little support, five dog beds made quick and easy.  Making all these beds took about an hour total sewing time.  Add a bit for the cleaning and drying, but all in all a very fast project.

Pillow Dog Beds at From My Carolina Home

So, now you can have some fresh pillows for your bed, and the dogs get new beds too.  Nothing goes to the landfill.  How long has it been since you got a new pillow?

 

Sharing

Vintage Charm

Talk of the Town


230 Comments

The Swing Bag – A Scrap Dance Pattern

Wouldn’t you love to have a great travel bag for the holidays, or any travel weekend?  This weekender bag is compact yet packs a punch. You won’t believe how much you can fit into it, and still have organization!  It will hold enough clothes and toiletries for a weekend getaway, just Swing it over your shoulder and dance off to the beach or the cabin in the mountains.  The construction isn’t hard, just follow the steps one by one. The great majority is constructed flat, so it is easy to handle. Use up scraps by making a larger piece of fabric and cutting your focus piece from it. Use charm squares, jelly roll strips, layer cake squares, crumbs or orphan blocks, your only limit is your imagination!

After the initial bag was done, I showed it to some friends who suggested a few improvements.  So, the pattern has several options for extras in pockets and details.  Purchasing the pdf file on Craftsy for the very low introductory price of just $2 will give you more photos and more detailed instructions.  Click on Swing Bag for the pattern link.   I really appreciate any purchases as that is the way I pay for the costs of the blog, so I can bring more great free patterns, giveaways and projects to readers.  I also invite new readers to follow my blog for a wide variety of subjects, crafting and cooking, sewing and quilting, gardening and photography, mountain living and more.

And have fun with the  Christmas In July blog hop which will have new posts every day for 12 days.

Here are the participant blogs, have fun!!  And read down below for the giveaway!

Friday, July 14th
From My Carolina Home– You are here!

.

Saturday, July 15th

.

Sunday, July 16th

.

Monday, July 17th

.

Tuesday, July 18th
.
Wednesday, July 19th 

.

Thursday, July 20th

.

Friday, July 21st

.

Saturday, July 22nd 

.

.

.

 

Are you starting on your holiday sewing yet?

 

Sharing

Finished or Not Friday


28 Comments

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear

Shopping can be such a chore at times. As much as I like wearing nice clothes, sometimes it is just next to impossible to find what I need.  It is hard enough to find things in petite sizing to accommodate my short stature, much less something cute.  Recently I spent quite a bit of time at a number of stores, at big box, discount and boutiques, looking for a simple thing – a short sleeve woven top or two. I am at that certain point where I do not like my upper arms to be exposed, so a sleeveless isn’t an option. But I need something woven for the heat, knits like t-shirts seem to stick to me when it is really hot and woven fabrics keep me cooler. But sleeveless and knits are what I saw most at the stores! I could find long sleeves or sleeveless but nothing between. Luckily, I can sew, and when I finally remembered that, I found two long sleeve, woven fabric tops and took them home to alter.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

This is really not hard to do, just takes a bit of measuring to get it right. Begin by trying on the top, and measuring from the shoulder seam to the point where you want the sleeve to end.  Shoulder seams will sit differently on different tops, so you have to have that measurement correct by measuring with it on.  In my case, that was 9 inches finished length. I wanted a small cuff on this one, so I added five inches to that length. Be sure that you have enough width in the sleeve to do this (that it doesn’t taper smaller down the sleeve), otherwise just add a hem allowance. Then take the top off, and lay it on a cutting table, measuring from the shoulder seam down the top edge, in my case to 14 inches.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

That measurement was going to cut across this tab and button detail on the sleeve, so I got out my seam ripper and removed those elements.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Now measure down the top edge to the 14 inches again, and lay a ruler at that point, but don’t cut yet.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Now, measure from the bottom to the same point. In this case it was 9 inches to the bottom of the cuff. Now measure the same 9 inches on the bottom edge to find that point. Connect those two points on the top and bottom of the sleeve to ensure that the angle is correct. The angle of the cut should be the same as (parallel to) the lower edge of the sleeve.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Now measure up from the bottom of the other sleeve by the same amount on the top and bottom, the same 9 inches. This ensures that the sleeves will be an equal length.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

I decided to finish off the edges with my serger. If you don’t have a serger, you can turn the edge under, or do a zigzag stitch to finish the edge.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Measure up three inches to put in the hem.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Stitch the hem. Removing the base on my sewing machine helps as it gives me a smaller base to slip the sleeve over.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Press the hem.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Fold up the hem 2 inches to the outside to create the cuff and press in place.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

I put in two tacks by hand to hold the cuff in place.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

And voila, now I have the short sleeve top I wanted.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

One other tip, those mother of pearl buttons would be impossible to replace if I lost one. So, I took the extras from the cuffs, and sewed them onto the seam allowance at the sides of the top. Now I have extras if I lose one, and I don’t have to go searching for it in a button box.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

For the white lace top, I followed the same procedure of measuring the length I wanted, measuring the sleeve from the bottom on both edges, and cutting the sleeve at the proper angle.  This time I made the sleeve 10 inches, to get the 9-inch finished length plus one inch for hem allowance.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

I wasn’t worried about the lace raveling, so I turned up the hem and zigzag stitched it.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

And the other top is done, took less than half an hour.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

For the bits you cut off, here’s an idea to use them. I did get a couple of new t-shirts while I was shopping, knowing I have bought this brand before so I knew the size to get. I didn’t try them on, and when I did put one on at home, the V-neck was cut to an obscene depth. I am just not comfortable with a neckline cut to my navel, not at this point in my life, LOL! So, I took some of the lace from the sleeve, and cut a triangle to sew into the t-shirt to raise the neckline.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Ultimately, I decided to use a different scrap of lace, cut from a pillowcase that was torn. I cut a triangle larger than I needed for the opening, and pinned it into place. It was sewn into place by topstitching in the ditch of the neckline ribbing.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Turning it inside out, the excess was trimmed away.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

Finished, and I am so much more comfortable with the added coverage.

How to Shorten Sleeves on Ready to Wear clothes at From My Carolina Home

So, there are a couple of ideas to help you make ready to wear more wearable.  Do you alter your clothes?

 

Sharing

Creative Muster