From My Carolina Home

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Quilting for Foster Care

A friend’s quilting group is making a couple of quilts for a local foster care facility, and she asked me to quilt one of them. The quilts are oversize twins, so having them longarm quilted was the groups first choice. Luckily we have a group of longarmers in the area willing to do these larger quilts. So, she brought the quilt top, batting and backing to me last week. It is all done with navy on white prints, with red sashing and a solid navy border. I spread it out to look at it, and measure it against the backing.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Loading it on the longarm, I was delighted that the quilt hangs perfectly straight when folded up, showing that those borders were applied correctly and flat!

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The batting she brought is Quilter’s Dream Green, the first time I have used this batting made from recycled plastic bottles.   After quilting with it, I am a fan and will buy this for myself in the future.  I think we have to create markets for recycled materials so we keep as much as possible out of the landfills.  This batting quilts just as easily as the Warm and Natural I usually use.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The backing is a light blue with white polka dots. Looking at the top and the back, right away I knew the only choice of thread color was white. It would blend on the back, and give the solid navy border a pattern to blend with the busy prints in the interior of the quilt. My usual tendency would be to go with darker thread, but quilting this in navy would show glaringly on the back, disappear in the border, and might compete with the prints making them even busier.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Quilting the first row, I was happy with the look of the pantograph. The prints are just so busy that the quilting disappears on them, but shows up nicely in the border. I used Essentials thread in the top and Bottom Line in the bobbin.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

This pantograph is called Rosie from Willow Leaf Studios.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The backing was really a bit small for this top, it was only about 5 inches wider, and it needs to be 8 inches wider. Now, you may think this is no big deal, and really it isn’t. Of course, we can work around it, and the glitches may not seem a problem, but let me show you what happens. In the picture below, the machine head hit the clamp, and results in the two flat spots on the edge of the flower which should be a smooth curved line.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Is this a big deal?  Well, no. But it startles me as I am quilting, as I never expect to hit the clamp. Luckily this time it didn’t result in a broken thread or worse a broken needle, but it could. And that creates more work for me. Having the right amount of overage on the backing ensures that the quilting goes smoothly, and the result is no glitches.  And I can return a quilt without boo-boos, which pleases me.  Getting to the bottom, the flat border is just such a joy to quilt!

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I took it off the frame, and took a pic of the overall quilt. But the sky was overcast, and the light wasn’t bright enough in the studio to see the quilted border.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

So, here is one last look at the bottom corner.

Foster Care Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

My friend picked it up and was very pleased with the choices of pantograph and thread.  I hope it will bring some comfort to a child in foster care.  What are you working on?

 

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Needle and Thread Thursday

 


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Quilting the On-Point Quilt

Quilting this violet and green on-point setting quilt was finished on a rainy afternoon.  Outside is so much green now, and getting more green by the day.  I usually unplug the longarm during thunderstorms as I don’t fully trust the surge protector, but a light gentle rain makes for a cozy day in the basement to sew.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I did have a fix to make on the backing. I picked a big piece of dark green out of the stash, cut it in half and seamed it together  lengthwise to make it wide enough. Unfortunately, there was this little bite out of one edge.  Naturally I didn’t find it until the other side and the rest of this side was pinned to the leaders.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

This is a problem when loading a backing on a longarm. That unsecured edge will allow the backing edge to sag and create an uneven pull across the backing, that might result in puckers or pleats on the back. So, I pinned a bit of fabric in the open space to allow the edge to be secured to the leader. Pinning was enough, I didn’t need to take it off and sew this little patch in.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

So all loaded, and now to do the stand and stare. I was thinking that it would really be special to quilt feather wreaths in the solid purple print squares, and some other freehand motifs in the four patches.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Ultimately I went with a pantograph again.  I had two more quilts in the queue and needed to get this one done and off the frame.  The pantograph has a feather design, and looked nice in the border squares.  I used a darker thread to make the quilting pop in the light areas.  An adjustment to the bobbin tension after this row tightened up the stitches.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Then in the purple print, it made a nice texture.  I used polyester thread on the top in a golden brown, and Bottom Line in the bobbin.  The batting is Warm and Natural.  The pantograph is called Feelin’ Groovy designed by Michelle Wyman and Terri Watson of Heart and Soul Quilts, and sold by Willow Leaf Studio.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The darker thread color shows nicely in the white.  I like the density of this pantograph too.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Finishing up the quilting, the feather design quilts up nicely.

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

Cutting off the excess after the quilting was complete, the dark green had enough left over to make binding.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

And, all done, ready to donate.

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

Now, I just need to decide where it will go. It is lap quilt size, so it could go to either the senior center or the chemo center. It might come down to which friend comes over next, LOL!!

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

I have another QOV to do, and one for a foster care center, both large quilts that will take some time.  Luckily, they both will use pantographs too.  I’ll show those to you soon.

Have you finished a project recently?

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.


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Angel Quilt

Recently, a friend of mine gave me this sweet fabric. It isn’t a panel, but it has squares with angels playing in their gardens.  The soft greens and yellows with the printed purple sashing is just a charming color palette.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

There are three angel designs in the fabric.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Initially, I thought it would be a good time to practice some custom quilting, outlining the blocks and doing some feathers.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

But, loading it up, I decided just to do a pantograph and get it done for giving away.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The pantograph is a pansy with leaves, as it went with the gardening theme in the panel.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I used a light yellow thread by Essentials, with Bottom Line in the bobbin, also in yellow.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Batting is Warm and Natural. The soft colors will be nice for a little girl.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

It quilted up fast, and I was done in an afternoon.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I trimmed it so the purple sashing was relatively even.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Digging in the stash, this yellow rose fabric was perfect for the binding.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Hand stitched to the back was fast too.  The backing is a tone on tone ivory, and did well with the pale yellow Bottom Line in the bobbin.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

All done and ready for donation.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I am not sure where this one will go yet. But, I am sure it will be loved by someone soon.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

What are you working on now?

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.

 

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Slow Sunday Stitching

Crazy Mom Quilts

 


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Applique Quilt Repair

Repairing a well loved quilt is one of the things I really enjoy doing.  Sometimes a quilt is just used to the point of falling apart, and really, what better tribute to a wonderful quilt than for the owner to wear it out?  I’d much rather see that than a beautiful quilt wrapped in tissue and hidden in a drawer.  Recently an applique quilt came to me for repairs, and I wanted to show a couple of techniques I used to give it more life.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Beautifully made by the owner’s grandmother, there is love here in every stitch. I was delighted that the owner brought it to be repaired before it was too damaged. Getting to these rips early makes it easier to repair.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Some of the appliques were lifting up, but not too many.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

I began with the rips. First I ironed the sections to be sure there was still enough fabric remaining to support the repair.  There was.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Next I cut a small bit of fusible web, making sure I had enough to cover all the ripped areas.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Turn back the edges and slip the fusible web under the fabric, and on top of the batting. I make sure that the webbing extends past all the ripped areas so the edges will fuse.  The quilting wasn’t disturbed during this part, as the rips were not in a quilted area.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Press carefully, making sure the stray threads and edges are secured.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Now, satin stitch over the rip.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

The webbing reinforced fabric is strong enough to stitch now, and the matching thread will make this hard to see at a casual look.  It actually took us a minute to find the repair when she picked it up.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

The appliques were hand stitched, being careful not to go all the way through the quilt. The quilt is hand quilted in white thread, with a white backing. I didn’t want any red or green thread to show.  This quilt was so soft and warm, it was a joy to stitch on a rainy Sunday afternoon.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Since the appliques were already needle-turned, this part was relatively easy.  I checked the rest of the appliques to be sure the others were still holding.  All in all there were only about 8 that needed to be resewn.  I’ll tell you a secret, I almost wished for more appliques to lift so I could work on it more, LOL!!

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

All done, and the owner was happy with the result. I advised her to have the binding redone at some point in the future as it is beginning to really wear thin.  I did whip stitch a bit of it to hold for now.  The great thing is she has lots of time to find the right fabric for a new binding that will keep the quilt usable for years to come.  She can find something close in color, and wash it over and over, dry it in the dryer, and hang it in the sun until it fades to just the right shade and softens to the touch.

Applique Quilt Repair @ From My Carolina Home

Do you have any well loved quilts?

 

Sharing…

Slow Sunday Stitching


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A Puppy Quilt

Last month I left a comment on a quilty UFO adoption post on a fellow blogger’s event. Cyndi blogs at Quilting is More Fun Than Housework, and every so often she does a link up event. You post a UFO that you just don’t have the enthusiasm to finish, and then pick a person who comments on it to send it to. She picked my name for her giveaway panel of an adorable puppy.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I got it about a week later, and laid it out over the longarm bar to load and quilt when the one I was working on was done. But that came and another one was loaded for another charity event, and I was still staring at this panel. My enthusiasm for it was waning, it just didn’t speak to me at all. The longer I looked at it, the less I liked it. Finally, I decided to figure out what was wrong with it in my eyes, and fix that. Right away, once I really analyzed the panels components, I decided I really didn’t care for the difficult color in the border. That not quite orange, not really salmon, neon apricot took all the focus away from the puppy. So, first up, get rid of it.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I cut the puppy part out of the center, and also cut the dark navy background into usable sections. I found more fabrics in my stash that I liked a lot better, and used a rust in the same family as that orange to tone it down. Adding the first border, I sewed from the panel side so I could follow the first navy frame on the panel.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Oh, yes, liking this a lot better. This rust, brown and navy print makes a nice frame and tones down the garish salmon in the panel to where you don’t notice it anymore. Now the puppy takes center stage.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Then I added back the original navy bubble print.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I once again used my trick of adding squares around the panel to enlarge it. Using the colors pulled from stash, I cut strips, sewed those together then cross cut for squares.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Laying them out, I again made one or two a tiny bit bigger to cover the gap.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Next row of border completed, plus a final border to get a nice lap size.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Loading it on the longarm, I quilted it with a pantograph that reminded me of soap bubbles.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Bound with the lighter brown, it was ready for delivery.  Changing the colors in the borders to more muted tones makes the quilt suitable for either a boy or girl.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I took it to a local rescue group Charley’s Angels. They rescue dogs and cats from local kill shelters. The quilt will be offered at their Bark in the Park auction which will be in May. This is the group that started the incredible program of putting adoptable dogs at a local hotel to interact with guests. They have adopted out an amazing number of dogs this way.

Adopt Me at From My Carolina Home

This sweet face was looking for a forever home while I visited.

Adopt Me at From My Carolina Home

It is so sad that as a society, we still have so many animals euthanized every year due to having too many to care for.   Irresponsible owners who don’t spay or neuter then let their animals wander is a huge problem in western NC, and elsewhere.

Puppy Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

We aren’t quite ready to have another dog yet, but when we are, we will look once again to the shelters first.  Our last three dogs have come from rescue groups like this one.  Yes, sometimes the dogs have issues, but love, patience, and training can usually overcome any problem.  Most health issues can be managed, too.

Are you a supporter of your local humane society?

 

Linking up

Freemotion on the River Linky Tuesday

Show and Tell with Bambi

Em’s Scrap Bag

Confessions of a Fabric Addict


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Easter Decorating

Easter is just days away now.  I didn’t do a lot of decorating for this holiday this year.  One thing I do have to put out every year, though, is this adorable, now vintage, Happy Easter train.  Look closely and you can see the word Happy spelled out in twig letters held by the little bunnies.  The word Easter is spelled out on the train cars.  This year I have it on the kitchen counter.

Easter Train ~ From My Carolina Home

The Spring Tulip Mini Quilt is on the stand.  I need to get a few more designs done for this stand.

Easter Decorating at From My Carolina Home

On the wall is my original disappearing nine patch based quilt, Stacked Bricks.  That pattern is free in my Craftsy store.

Easter Decorating at From My Carolina Home

This little Button basket is a fun crafting project.  Just glue pastel color buttons to the side of a basket in rows of colors, then fill with some silk flowers.

Easter Decorating at From My Carolina Home

This little ducky is too cute with her Easter hat and egg.  I put a silk violet in a yellow basket nearby.

Easter decorating at From My Carolina Home

Over on the coffee table, I set out a wool-work rabbit penny rug with a glass bunny on it.

Easter decorating at From My Carolina Home

So, not a lot of specifically Easter decorations, most will stay out until summer.  Are you decorating for spring?

 

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Brag About It!

Celebrate Your Story

Creative Muster

Talk of the Town


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Quilting Magnolia Attic Window

Loading the longarm with the Magnolia Attic Window quilt, I thought a lot about how to quilt it. I knew I wanted the quilting and the color of thread to enhance the shadows and sashing without overpowering the large magnolia print.  Click HERE to see the original construction.

Magnolia Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Auditioning colors for the quilting, there were a lot of choices. I decided on a medium green.  Naturally the perfect matching green to the sashing didn’t have enough left on the spool to do the entire quilt.  So, it was the next best color Essentials thread on the top, and Bottom Line in a sage color in the bobbin.  Warm and Natural batting, single layer Warm and White.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Initially, I thought I’d do a freehand treatment in all the sashings and something else on top of the magnolia flowers. So, what to do, ribbon candy? No. Alternating loops? Nah. Feathers? Not really in the mood for those either, too many turns to make. Over/under loops? Boring. In the end, I just went for a pantograph again.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The pantograph is Hyacinth Grande by Patricia Ritter for Urban Elementz.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The quilting went fairly quickly, as it is a lap size quilt. I was listening to an audiobook too, and didn’t want to stop the story, LOL!! Maybe that is a good incentive to keep sewing.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Quilting finished, it was removed from the frame and trimmed. Now, what to use for binding? I didn’t want to introduce another fabric, and I had plenty of the black or the green to use.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I settled on the black, made the binding, stitched it on the front of the quilt, and began the slow stitching part of the finishing.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Then I hand stitched a label made with a fabric scrap and writing the information with a pigma pen.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I plan to show this quilt at the fair this year, so it will need a sleeve too. A little more handwork was in store, adding one of my Re-Usable Quilt Sleeves.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Now, all done. And I won’t have to rush this summer to get the sleeves done.

Magnolia Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I am going to hang this one from the display rod in the basement sewing area near the longarm.  I tried to get a picture of that for you, but they all came out so dark, likely because the sunlight was pretty bright in the windows.

What are you working on now?

 

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Whoop Whoop!!

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Freemotion Linky Tuesday

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