From My Carolina Home

Quilting, cooking, reading books, gardening, crafting, sewing, photography and more


7 Comments

Scrap Dance Two Step March

How’s your mystery going so far, are you caught up and ready for the next step?  I really get a big kick out of seeing all the different color combinations, and choices for backgrounds.  There are some new posts in the Flickr group with really interesting quarter-square triangle units, such diversity!  I can hardly wait to tell you the rest of the steps so I can see the finishes of these wonderful quilts.  But, I’ll just have to have patience, not my strong suit, LOL!

Scrap Dance Two-Step Mystery Quilt Along

Match the 5″ background squares with an equal number of 5-inch scrap squares for your chosen size.  Draw lines on the back of the lighter square on the diagonal.

I have found it easier to actually draw the sewing line 1/4-inch away from the center line (that I do not draw), so I draw 2 lines on each square.

If you are using another method, make as many of these units as you have 5-inch background squares in your chosen size cutting instructions.  Chain stitch the units.

Cut apart and press to the darker side.

Now let’s Two-Step!  Take the remaining 5″ color scraps, make two color HSTs.  Pair up the squares with as much contrast as you can with color or value.

Cut apart and press to the darker side.  Square all HST units to 4-1/2 inches.

And that’s the Two-Step for March.  PDF – Two Step March  Don’t forget to share your progress in the Scrap Dance Flickr group.  If you missed any steps, or you are just now finding this post, click on the category of 2017 Scrap Dance Mystery Two Step on the sidebar to see all the posts for the mystery.

So, how’s your Two-Step coming along?  Or, how’s your progress on your current project?

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save


17 Comments

Mardi Gras Cookie Party

It is Mardi Gras season, a great excuse to celebrate and set a nice table for some great food.  Mardi Gras celebration is an entire season of carnival activities for some cities. Mobile Alabama claims the very first celebration. New Orleans has a street fair and parades. Costume celebrations are held in Austria and Switzerland, and other areas around the world. Mardi Gras was on my mind as I prepared to host a board meeting for one of my clubs.  We had a lot of heavy decisions to make, so to make the meeting a bit lighter in tone, I decided to make it a cookie party. The dining room table was protected with a pad and tablecloth, then topped with a quilted table topper in my Amazing Value Play pattern.

Mardi Gras Meeting table 1

The centerpiece is a yellow ceramic basket, with greenery and purple flowers inside. Mardi Gras beads were draped over and around the basket, with some Mardi Gras coins scattered about.  The glittery purple and gold apples work well with the theme.

Mardi Gras Meeting table 5

The purple note pads and funky napkins were found at the dollar store, along with some additional beads for the table.  Everyone will get a beaded necklace to take home.

Mardi Gras Meeting table 3

The fun ceramic dessert plates are a thrift store find, couldn’t be a better match for the table.

Mardi Gras Meeting table 2

I made my Vanilla Sugar Cookies for the meeting. Rolling out the dough, I used a fluted round cutter to suggest coins.

Mardi Gras Vanilla Sugar Cookies 1a

They bake up quickly.

Mardi Gras Vanilla Sugar Cookies 1b

Frosting them lightly with icing, they were sprinkled with purple, green and gold sugar crystal decorations instead of Christmas colors.

Mardi Gras Vanilla Sugar Cookies 7

Turned out pretty tasty looking, huh?

Mardi Gras Vanilla Sugar Cookies 4

I made some chocolate chip cookies too, but these are the stars for the day.

Mardi Gras Vanilla Sugar Cookies 8

The name Mardi Gras is actually French for Fat Tuesday, and that will be next Tuesday, February 28th.  Then you can set a lovely table with a Mardi Gras Theme like this one from last year.

Mardi Gras Tablescape | From My Carolina Home

Using a crown, some evening bags, coins and beads, this is a fun table for a Tuesday meal.

Mardi Gras Tablescape | From My Carolina Home

In the mood for a bit of quilting?  Make my Mardi Gras Mini Quilt.

Mardi Gras Mini Quilt | From My Carolina Home

I used small seed beads to suggest a bead necklace on the top of the green, gold and purple block like the ones participants throw to the crowds during the parades.  See that construction with this link – Mardi Gras Mini Quilt.

Mardi Gras Mini Quilt | From My Carolina Home

Want a cookie?

Mardi Gras Vanilla Sugar Cookies 11

Do you have any plans for Mardi Gras?

Sharing

Foodie Friday

Saturday Sparks

Full Plate Thursday

 


48 Comments

ABC Quilt

A friend of mine gave me this panel to use for a charity quilt.  When she gave it to me, I thought, well that’s sweet, and stuffed it away for later.  I didn’t really look that close at it.  While pulling out fabrics for donation quilts, I ran across it again, and figured it was time to get it quilted up for a charity.  So, I pulled some backing fabric, and loaded it on the longarm.  While I was loading it, I noticed the S block had a sheep.  Well sure it does.  Oh, but wait, the sheep has a Sunflower.  And it is sitting on a Stool!  Isn’t that cute!  I kept looking at it, and found 17 items that start with an S in the block. Want a little puzzle for a Sunday? Can you find 17?

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Well, now I have to look at a few other blocks, like the Alligator eating Apples. Oh, look, he’s wearing Argyle!  I only found five A words in this one.

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

The Moose has Muffins and is toasting Marshmallows. I found ten M words in this block, can you find them? I cannot figure out the Native American design blankets though, what could those be that start with M? Do you know?

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

The panel is called Hungry Animal Alphabet from Quilting Treasures, and I tried to track it down.  I really think this is just so stinkin’ cute, and would love to do a bunch of them for the local kids.  But, alas, it is discontinued. There is a new one with red borders, but it is only available at full retail in a few online stores. That would be OK if I wanted one for a treasured family member, but too expensive for charity quilts.  The manufacturer doesn’t have any more, so there isn’t a way to do a bulk wholesale order.  My favorite online retailers are sold out, and the LQS doesn’t have it.   I do wish that fabric companies would keep producing things as cute as this for more than one production run.  This is a timeless design!

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Oh, well.  I loaded it on the longarm with the remnant of the wool batting from quilting Scrap Dance Waltz.  I will be pinning a label on the quilt to be sure the recipient knows it isn’t a flame retardant batting.  Quilting it with a pantograph from top to bottom, it was easier to deal with the higher loft than on the Waltz quilt where I did the borders first.

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

It looked fine while I was quilting it…

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

but, when I got it finished, I realized that using that batting on this quilt was a mistake.  The higher loft makes it more difficult to see the detail in the blocks.  Some handwork on Sunday to finish off the binding and it was finished.

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I ironed it, and that helped a bit, but it would have been better to use cotton for this. It is done, though, and will be donated to a charity soon.

ABC Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

What are you working on?  Did you find 17 items in the S block?  What are those blankets on the M block?

 

Slow Sunday Stitching

Let’s Bee Social

Needle and Thread Thursday

Whoop Whoop Friday

Tips and Tutorials Tuesday


46 Comments

Labeling Quilts and Keeping Records

How often we quilters talk about labeling your quilts!  We say that labeling is not only to remind you when you made a quilt, but to tell others that you made it and when, but it also has another purpose – one I hope you never need. I think most of us wait until after the binding is done, then add a label. Some use preprinted labels, some use hand printed with pens….

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

and some do embroidered labels.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Recently I realized that I needed labels for several quilts that have never been shown. Sometimes I forget to do it once a quilt is done, unless it is going in a show or the fair. So I got out the pigma pens and made some quick labels and pinned them on for some Sunday hand stitching.  Then I got to thinking about this in a different light because of an email conversation with Rich Richey.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

We often don’t realize that a label is more than just identification, it may be needed to protect our work.  A hand whipped label to the backside is perfectly fine for documenting who made the quilt, along with when and where, but consider this.  Someone stealing your quilt can easily take that off.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Certainly having good photographs of the front will be essential to recovering your quilt if it was stolen, but you might need to go further.  A good starting point would be to have a label that cannot be removed.  Here are two ideas. First, use a pigma pen to write your information directly on the backing after the quilt is quilted.  Certainly this is a label that cannot be removed.  Using a complementary pen color is nice.  If you like the look of a pretty embroidered label, just place the pretty one over the written one.  You are protected against the label being removed.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

I have also been experimenting with embroidering the information on the back prior to quilting.  I began with marking the position I needed to have the information on the backing, using pins and chalk.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Ironing on tear away stabilizer gives the embroidery area some heft, and aids in keeping the fabric flat while the letters are embroidered.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Then, position the fabric under the needle, check again to make sure it is going the right way, take a deep breath, and punch the button. My machine will embroider two ways, one is continuous lettering and the other uses a hoop.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

It is a bit hard to read, but it says Scrap Dance Waltz with my name, date and location in red thread. I wanted it to blend with the backing and not be noticeable unless you are looking for it.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Flipping it over, I tore away the stabilizer, leaving only the stitching and a tiny bit of stabilizer under the thicker sections of letters. I’ll let you know how the quilting goes over this area.  I anticipate that I won’t be able to tell where it is as I am quilting.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Recently, on another blog (and I cannot find the post now to link it) I saw a quilter had sewn her label onto the back then quilted over it.  That would also make it difficult to remove.  Beyond that, some other suggestions for proving you made the quilt is to write your name on the edge under the binding.  A thief wouldn’t take the time to undo a binding to make sure there isn’t a name somewhere.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Another idea is to photograph the backside, particularly if the back is pieced.  Major works of art have the edges of a canvas usually covered by the frame photographed as a method to identify the genuine from the forgery.  The same idea could be applied to quilts, by taking close up shots of the quilting in the corners for whole cloth backings, or the piecing design for a pieced backing.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Certainly we all hope that your quilt would never be stolen, but in that case, how would you prove that the quilt is yours?  Such a situation occurred in Houston just this past November when Jamie Wallen’s trailer was stolen at Quilt Festival in Houston in November from the parking lot of the hotel. It was recovered a day or two later, wrecked and abandoned, with all the quilts missing.  Some were customer quilts.  A few days later, a lady walking found a trash bag full of some of the missing quilts, and more were recovered later, but four customer quilts are still missing.  Those quilts might end up at a flea market, beautiful and seemingly a bargain, likely with the label removed.  How would you know it was stolen?  You wouldn’t.  Would you even think to look around on the internet to find out?  Likely not.  But, what if you were the person who made the quilt, publicizing it around might help it be found.  Maybe some other quilter would recognize your missing quilt at a flea market or resale shop.  Great, now, prove it is yours.  This is a horrible situation, and I hope that no one ever has a quilt stolen, but it points out the need for as much documentation as you can do.  Rich Richey, Jamie’s partner, and I were emailing recently and I got an update from him.  He only had one photo of this quilt, and no pictures of the others stolen from Jamie’s private collection.  This beautiful green quilt called Rhapsody in Green is still missing.

rapsody

This class example quilt is also still missing, along with three others that Jamie used to demonstrate some of his techniques.  I took this picture when I took his class, and Rich was happy to see a picture of one of the still missing quilts.  Likely it is in a landfill at this point as I am sure someone with no knowledge of quilting would not see its value.  I am happy to report that according to Rich, the criminal responsible was caught, has already been prosecuted and is serving a 25 year sentence.

p1030996

Sadly, four of Jamie’s customer quilts are still missing, but Rich didn’t have any of photographs of those quilts to share.  I have not yet found any mention of who the last four stolen customer quilts belong to, what they look like or any pictures of them. This totally baffles me, why wouldn’t you publicize a custom quilted quilt that was stolen?  There is a site for listing lost and stolen quilts called Lost Quilts (lostquilt.com) but there are no listings referencing the theft.  Even if the maker didn’t have pictures of the finished quilt (because Jamie did the quilting and was to deliver them back at the show), they should still have pictures of the flimsy. By now, those quilts and the Rhapsody In Green quilt could be anywhere.  Without any publicity on the last four missing quilts from Jamie’s customers, it is not likely they will ever be recovered.

If you ever decide to enter a national or local show, be sure you do as much as you can to make sure your identifying information on the quilt is permanent.  Quilts have been lost in shipping, stolen presumably because the address indicated it was going to a quilt show.  I remember when I shipped a quilt to the AQS show, they were very careful to tell me how to label the box so it wouldn’t be obvious that it was going to a quilt show, and if I insured it, to call it a blanket not a quilt.  Sad, but you just never know.

Labeling Quilts and Documenting ~ From My Carolina Home

Those of us with blogs tend to take a lot of photos of our finished work, but how many of you that don’t blog take the time to document your quilting?  Will you look at labeling the same way now?

 

Sharing

Let’s Bee Social

Needle and Thread Thursday

Whoop Whoop Friday

Crazy Mom Quilts

Show Off Saturday

Oh Scrap!

Main Crush Monday

Tips and Tutorials Tuesday

Linky Tuesday Freemotion by the River


15 Comments

Autumn Jubilee Update

Time for an update and a look at what readers are doing with the blocks for Autumn Jubilee.  It is so much fun to see all the ways you all are putting your leaves and pumpkins together.

Autumn Jubilee Runner Finish 2

Susan did a great job with her runner, starting with large leaves, and making the pumpkins small.  Her quilting is wonderful too!

Autumn Jubilee table runner all quilted and bound.

I have to show you Diann’s mini quilt and matching pillow. What a cozy corner, love those fabric choices!

image

Danice is doing both the runner with these marvelous scrappy leaves…

AUTUMN JUBILEE SMALL TABLE RUNNER

and the stitch along! Great progress!

AUTUMN JUBILEE WOOL PENNY RUG- front

I love these scrappy fall color leaves by Desert Sky Susan!

4Leaves

The pumpkin border on Judy’s runner is just the perfect choice.

DSCN2389

Debbie finished her mini quilt….

IMG_0672

and also is doing the stitch along.

Felt Sunday Project

Tomorrow will be the largest project in the series. Enter for me to quilt it for you by adding your progress photo to the Flickr group. It can be any of the quilt-along sizes, runner or topper doesn’t matter, just that you’d like to have me quilt it.  I’ll choose a winner from the pictures on November 1.  You don’t have to be ready to ship, just have a progress photo up.  The winner will send their top and backing to me whenever it is ready to be quilted, and I will provide the batting, quilting with this pumpkins and leaves pantograph, and return shipping.

Autumn Jubilee Runner Finish 3

Depending on when I receive it, I’ll try to have it back to you in time to use on Thanksgiving.  But if it is later, that’s OK.  Timing will be up to the winner, so no pressure to finish unless you want it for this year.

All the giveaways are still open for comments, so if you missed one you still have time to enter.

What are you working on?


27 Comments

Victorian Pastel Quilt

This was a beautiful quilt, and so pretty in the pastel pinks and purples.  I love this combination of colors.  The blocks are five sided log cabin style with at least a dozen different prints.  They were left for our local club’s program chair at our sew in and no one claimed credit.   The blocks were so pretty, and Marti set them on point with pale pink squares, and found a neat striped fabric for the border.  She wanted some kind of quilting that would show nicely in those pink blocks and I had the perfect thing.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

Once again, the quilt is flat as can be even with all the bias edges in the setting design.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

The pantograph is the same one I used on my AQS jury accepted quilt 2 years ago at the national show.  It is called Plumeria Garden by designer Lisa Calle at Intelligent Quilting.  It takes up excess fabric nicely if there are waves in the piecing, but this wasn’t needed in a quilt constructed by Marti. Heaven to quilt. Loading it up, I auditioned thread colors, and decided on a sweet pink Essentials thread. As usual, I put Bottom Line in the bobbin. The batting is Warm and White donated by The Warm Company. I started the quilting, and rolled it to the next pass.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

Remember how I always say that I learn something with every quilt? Well this one was no different. Sometimes it is an exercise in problem solving. This time, while quilting one pass, the laser light wasn’t firmly tightened, so it drifted during the quilting. What that left me with was gaps in only part of the quilting between passes.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

Oh great, now what. I couldn’t quilt another pass of the pantograph because there wasn’t enough room between the two. and when I got to the other end, the pantographs fit together again.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

So, after a little thought, I decided on doing a bit of echo quilting, with a bit of the motif shapes as I could do them freehand. Whew! It doesn’t follow the pattern, but on a charity quilt, I am hoping that the similar density will camouflage the mistake.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

The pantograph looks wonderful in those large pale pink squares, lovely texture.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

Once again, I marvel at how flat the joining points are between four blocks.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

I rotary cut the excess off after finishing the quilting.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

My favorite Slow Sunday stitching, putting on binding.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

All done, and ready to deliver.

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

I love these colors and this design. I am seriously thinking of making one for myself!

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

Someone is going to be just delighted!

Victorian Purples on Point ~ From My Carolina Home

Have you made a quilt with a block like this?

 

Sharing..

WIP With Friends

Needle and Thread Thursday at My Quilt Infatuation

Whoop Whoop Friday

Show Off Saturday at Sew Can She

Oh Scrap!

Main Crush Monday

Creativity Wednesday

 


10 Comments

Quick Charity Quilt

I pulled out a blue floral print as I was trying to clean out some fabrics.  I just happened to see another blue, and a yellow fat quarter at the same time.  I want to sew up more charity quilts, so this looked like a good combination.  But, because I am deep into doing the work on other projects, this one needed to be simple and quick.  No triangles this time!

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I started with cutting the blue and yellow fabrics into 3-1/2 inch strips, and sewing those in pairs. Cross cut into 3-1/2 inch units.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I sewed those into four patches.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Then I cut the blue floral into 6-1/2 inch squares and sewed one to each four-patch.  Make sure all your units are identical, it is important to the overall design.  I made sure I had a yellow square on the top of each unit.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Press towards the larger square. Sew two units together to make a strip of four blocks.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Alternating the orientation, the seams nest on the larger square.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

Alternating the orientation of the rows, gives me a checkerboard setting.  The yellow squares run diagonally one way while the blue ones go the other way, creating some movement in the design.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

For borders, I added a one inch border of dark green first to set the piecing apart from the borders. I only had enough of the blue for one 2-inch border, and not enough of the blue print as I would want the next border to be 3 inches wide.  So, I’ll use the blue print as binding.

Blue Yellow Charity Quilt ~ From My Carolina Home

I loaded it on the longarm and quilted half of one row of cute bows. Then the machine locked up. Seriously locked up. Something is really wrong. Unfortunately, Randy was out on vacation last week when this happened. So, with any luck, maybe I can get with him this week and get sewing again. I have a Moda Bake Shop quilt I need to get on the frame soon to have it ready for the August publication date. I am soooooo glad I started that one early!

Update – it is finished, see the completion HERE.

So, what are you working on now?