From My Carolina Home

Quilting, cooking, reading books, gardening, crafting, sewing, photography and more


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Making Card Carriers

With the NC Quilt Symposium coming to Asheville in 2018, our local longarm group is once again making small items to add to the goodie bags to get our group publicity.  For locals, and those who don’t mind mailing quilts to be quilted, we have a number of wonderful longarm quilters ready to make your creations sing with professional quilting services.  See our website at Carolina Mountain Longarm Association to find a quilter near you, or one that takes mail in tops.  If you are local, or you attended the Sympsium held in Hendersonville in 2015, you might remember our Chickens Project.   This year we decided to do small card wallets, or carriers, for credit cards or business cards, or even tea bags.  Each one of our members is making at least 30, so it is a stash busting project for me!

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

These are really easy to make. Start with cutting two pieces of fabric 7-1/2 x 5-1/4 inches. Cut another piece from another fabric 4-3/4 x 5-1/4 inches. Cut a piece of batting 7-1/2 x 5-1/4 inches.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Stack the batting with one large piece of fabric right side up on top. Fold the small piece in half, wrong sides together, and place this piece 2-1/2 inches from the bottom, with the fold towards the top. I find using my cutting board makes finding that placement easy.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Place the other large piece of fabric, right side down on top of the stack.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Place a few pins around to hold the pieces in position.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Sew around the edge, leaving an opening for turning, just be sure that the opening is not along the edge where the small piece is sewn, or along the bottom as that won’t get any additional stitching.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Clip the corners to reduce bulk and make the points nice.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Turn right side out, and press.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

At this point, you can change your mind as to which fabric goes on the outside, and which one goes on the inside. Just turn the inside panel to the other side.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Now, turn the bottom up, leaving a bit of the inside divider piece showing. Be sure you have the folded edge showing, and the raw edge at the bottom inside the fold.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Top stitch all the way around, enclosing the raw edge inside, and the opening for turning.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

When you are done, the raw edge will not be visible inside, and the divider will be fully sewn in.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

Now add some sort of closure. I used round velcro dots with velcro glue. You can sew in snaps by hand, or any other kind of closure you like. If you wanted to sew in the closure, do that before folding and topstitching.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

You can use the exact same fabric for all the pieces if you like. It does make the divider a bit harder to see.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

There is more definition with a contrast fabric.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

I have a good start on the 30 I need to make for the group’s total.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

I know some people like to carry tea bags in these too. Tea bags do fit, but if I was making it for this purpose, I might add 1/2 inch to the top-to-bottom measurement to make the pocket just a bit deeper.

Card Carrier ~ From My Carolina Home

One more afternoon and I had more than my required share all done. These are so easy and fast, use up a lot of batting scraps, and I think I’ll make a few more. I ran out of round velcro dots, so just used regular velcro strips cut into 3/4-inch squares.

Card Cases ~ From My Carolina Home

So, if you are local, and attend the Symposium next year, you’ll get one of these with your registration. They will have the longarm group’s card inside to remind you to look at our website for quilting services.  I have made a wide variety of them in different kinds of prints.  I made a few extra ones too, just in case someone gets a print they really don’t like.  We’ll have a few extra ones available so people can trade for a print they like better.

Don’t you love a quick project with no hand sewing?!!

 

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Best of 2016 and Goals for 2017

Who knew it would be difficult to write about the 5 Best posts of 2016 on From My Carolina Home!  As I near the end of my third year of blogging next month, it is amazing that I still have things to say, projects to sew, things to create with hot glue, cards to stamp, new recipes to cook and it is still fun.  So, what did I enjoy the most this year?  Well, instead of five posts, I am going to review three events.

Scrap Dance Tango Mystery Quilt Along

This was the second mystery quilt I designed, and it told me its name while it was in the design stage. The Scrap Dance series took off after this, and now has five patterns in the series, with #6 coming in January.  It was the second event I did on the blog.  The pattern for Tango is available in my Craftsy store, link on the sidebar.  You’ll also find Scrap Dance the original, Scrap Dance Quickstep, and The Charleston bag there too.

Tango Cover Shots 3

Christmas in July

I began thinking about doing this in the spring, and started designing new projects for a 12 day event.  I contacted my favorite companies for prizes and the response was terrific.  Sponsors included Aurifil Threads, Fat Quarter Shop, Connecting Threads, Stampin’ Up!, Superior Threads, and Primitive Gatherings.  I was just about done with planning when I got an invitation to join a blog hop, and was so very fortunate to be the first stop.  Many of the blog hoppers came back for more fun later in the event.  We began with the Sewing Kit / Jewelry Case Tutorial, and for the next 12 days made a wool applique penny rug, stamped cards, sewed a Christmas purse, made a mini quilt and a Christmas bed quilt, made ornaments, created gifts for guys and gifts from the kitchen, and then did some decorating and tablescapes.  And after all that, we settled down to rest with some Christmas themed books.  Click on the Christmas category on the sidebar and scroll down for all the posts.  I had a blast doing that event, and the sponsors were happy too.
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Santas 2

Autumn Jubilee

Then came my favorite season, Autumn.  Here is where I lost my mind, and committed to a month long event with 2 quilt alongs, a stitch along, sewing and crafting projects, tablescapes, thrift store finds and recycling, another wool applique pattern and a new recipe for Pumpkin Orange Bread.  I had a great time doing that, and again had marvelous support from my favorite sponsors with giveaways.  Sponsors for this event included Aurifil Threads, Fat Quarter Shop, Connecting Threads, Stampin’ Up!, Back Side Fabrics and Magnet King. Click on the Autumn Jubilee category on the sidebar to see all the projects.

autumnjubileelogo

So now, what will I do in 2017?  Time to set some goals for the year, with you in mind, dear reader. I need to get in a little bit of everything as usual, heavy on the quilting and sewing, with gardening, cooking, reading, crafting, card making, thrifting and recycling, and more thrown in for fun.

Goal 1 – Do a mystery quilt for 2017 – already in the works to begin in late January

Goal 2 – Plan another event during the 2017 year with giveaways from my favorite sponsors for readers

Goal 3 – Be a stop on a Christmas in July blog hop, not a 12 day event this year

Goal 4 – Publish Scrap Dance Waltz

Goal 5 – Do another Autumn event, as yet undetermined, encompassing a wide variety of projects

And finally a funny story about my best laugh of the year.  I was Christmas shopping for a calendar for DH, and I found a large display in a store.  One of them was called the Anti-Affirmation calendar and the cover shot made me laugh out loud.  Yes, in the store.  Could. Not. Stop.  Other customers were coming over to see what was just so funny.  In short order, I had a group of people laughing, and was still going as I went to check out.  No, I didn’t buy it.  The person I would want to give it to is my ex-boss, and I am quite sure it would not be appreciated.  So, what did it say that was so humorous?  Here it is, and maybe you had to be there, or maybe it was just my mood that day.  Or maybe it is truly hilarious, because I am still laughing as I type this!

“If I give you a straw, will you go suck the fun out of someone else’s life?”

Still laughing.  And committed to having fun this year!  Won’t you join me?

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Linking up with

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Scrap Dance on benchThe original Scrap Dance quilt pattern is available in my Craftsy store, along with all the Scrap Dance series patterns and more.


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Sew an Autumn Valence

My kitchen window has had the same valence over the shade for more years than I can count.  It was also over the kitchen window in our previous home, which amazingly had the same size window.  Of course, the view here always takes my attention, but the lace valence had seen better days.  I made it from the edge of a lace panel adding a green trim accent. The trim is now faded and discolored, and I am just tired of the look.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

So, time for a new one. These are so simple to make, ridiculously easy and fast, why don’t I have several to change with the seasons? So, Autumn Jubilee is starting, let’s make an Autumn Valence. I found this perfect striped print in the stash resource center. I cut the size I wanted, for me it was a 14 inch strip. For yours, measure the size of your window. The length should be 1-1/2 to 2 times the window width measurement, and the height should be 1/4-1/3 the height of the window.  I cut off the selvedge edges.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

I used my serger to join the strips for the length, and to finish the edges.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

If you don’t have a serger, no problem, just fold under 1/4-inch, iron and proceed on. I iron in the hem before topstitching.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

On the short sides, which will be the edges of the valence, turn under about 1/2-inch or so and topstitch.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

Turn down 3-inches at the top and press. This will become the rod pocket and the ruffle at the top.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

Stitch one inch from the top edge to form the ruffle over the top of the rod pocket.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

Then stitch at the bottom of the foldover to create the rod pocket. This will fit up to a 2 inch circumference rod easily.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

Topstitch the hem. Then hang it up!  The fabric was perfect, matching the butter yellow walls, and picking up the black in the appliances and countertop. It even has green and burgundy to pick up those colors in the accessories in the kitchen. Adding the fall leaves and flowers in the print, and it is a fall festival over the sink.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

I tucked that edge into the window after I took this picture. I am loving these colors! Such a contrast to the light lacy valence from before.  Start to finish took me just over one hour.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

Now the window looks fresh and new, with a great autumn print. I’ll be making a couple more and changing them with the seasons.

Autumn Window Valence ~ From My Carolina Home

You can upload pics of all your Autumn Jubilee projects to the Flickr group.  Debbie put her wreath on the group yesterday, and it is lovely.  Only pics of the quilt along will be eligible for the drawing for quilting by me, but any picture of any Autumn Jubilee project is welcome!  If you just found this blog, click on the Autumn Jubilee link to see the fun month-long celebration of Autumn with projects, a quilt along and giveaways!

Can you change your kitchen for the seasons?

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More Recycling and Repurposing

So, last weekend we made beds and mats for the humane society, and today will be more using up some other things you may have around the house to make more.  DH bought a new pillow for himself, and wanted to throw the old one away.  Of course, I couldn’t let him do that.  The fiberfill in his old pillow was perfectly fine for a dog bed, just pull away any fiberfill that looks dirty or stained after washing.  I pulled away just a bit of the top layer on the surface of the pillow stuffing, the edges and middle looked clean.  Then, I pulled out an old sheet that will never get used for quilt backing.  I cut it up into rectangles, and serged three edges.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

I used the serger for really only one main reason, to use the machine. Any machine needs to be used regularly to maintain it in working order. Plus, I have lots of thread for it!

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

But, just use your regular machine if you don’t have a serger. Sew three edges and part of the fourth leaving an opening for turning.  Stuff softly, then topstitch the edge closed.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

That old pillow will fill a bunch of dog beds.  The fiberfill gets very fluffy when pulled apart.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Smaller pieces of batting can be folded into the right size to fill a crate mat.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Just start with the size piece of fabric you want, then place the folded batting on top, trimming off any excess.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Sew the edges leaving an opening for turning. Roll the batting, and insert, then unroll inside for a flatter mat. This mat is 12 x 18 inches.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Then I had two pieces left over 10 x 16, those will be fine. I lay batting on the sewn cover and trimmed it to fit.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Then, I had little batting pieces like these left over.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Which turned into quite a fluffy stuffing when pulled apart with my hands.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

So, one pillow, one king size sheet, and some leftover batting scraps turned into this!

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Seven dog beds and two crate mats ready for a sweet dog or cat to use while waiting for a forever home. I cleared out a bunch of stuff from my sewing room between today’s project and last weekend’s beds, all from things that might have just been thrown away otherwise. Recycle and reuse.  Old pillowcases would make quick beds too.  And as reader Jeanne observed, an old hole filled blanket can be cut up for stuffing too. It is a win-win for me and the animals!

Do you have old pillows, pillow cases, blankets and sheets to recycle? What might you do with them?

 

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Decorating for Autumn

The weather should be cooling off a bit this coming week, at least that is the hope. It sure was still too warm last week when I met a friend for coffee. She reads my blog and said it was time to show some fall decorations. Of course, she is right (yes, you, CW!!). I did get a few out last week, and started the process with a Pumpkin Tablescape, but I realize I haven’t shown anything else. There is a method in my madness for that, as some things I am saving for the special event next month. More about that later in the week. But for now, I did get a few little details for the kitchen sink window sill.  The Happy Harvest sign is small, and the little tins have candles in them, never burned.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

In the library, a vibrant quilt called Autumn Around the Bend is hanging over a chair. It is difficult to get pictures in this room because the light is so bright through all the windows.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

Here’s the front of the chair. That little leaf pillow is all wool applique. No, I didn’t make it, but I plan to to something similar soon.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

Behind the chairs is a bookshelf that holds my cookbooks. The top now has an autumn leaf plate that was decoupaged with leaf fabric on the back by a local artist. Brown candles with pretty little candle rings, fall leaves and a ceramic pumpkin surround a stack of cookbooks that promise wonderful meals for cooler nights.  Casseroles, slow cooker meals, or pot pies, which to choose for that first cold weather meal?

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

My favorite autumn candle scent is called Autumn Wreath, sitting on a Maple Star hot pad. I burned one entirely last year and part of this one too. I really need to find a Yankee candle sale and get a couple more.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

The candle sits with the rooster placemats I made two years ago, flanked by autumn leaf plates.  We have breakfast on this counter a lot.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

On the kitchen pie safe, I put the Maple Leaf Table Runner I made two years ago.  A few more cookbooks chosen for their cover colors and recipes.  Who doesn’t like a hearty soup with homemade bread on a cold rainy day?  A tin with pumpkins and an autumn leaf basket go well.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

I also made a companion three leaf table runner for the little library table in the kitchen, but it wasn’t with the other one. It wasn’t in the autumn decor boxes. It wasn’t in the linen drawers in the antique china hutch. It wasn’t in the linen drawers in the antique secretary. Ok, now I am getting frustrated, where did I put the bloody thing? Cedar chest? No. Basement shelves? Nope. Under the bed? Ridiculous, I never put anything under the bed but I looked there anyway. I went back to doing some other things, but it still bugged me. Office closet? Nope. I complained to DH that I couldn’t find it, and he couldn’t offer any suggestions for places that I hadn’t already looked. But I went through all of them again. Two hours later it dawned on me. I gave it away. I took it as a hostess gift to some friends we were staying with last July. I figured I could make myself another one, then promptly forgot all about it! So, the library table got a rooster placemat.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

Isn’t that rooster trivet cute? Of course, it was a thrift store find just a couple of weeks ago, the colors are perfect for the kitchen.   The Gooseberry Patch cookbook Celebrate Autumn comes out each fall, maybe this year I’ll actually cook something from it.  Another thrift store find was the black plate stand. I stacked autumn inspired hot pads in it (made from the same panel as the rooster placemats) for both decoration and easy reaching from the stove.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

I hung the Maple Leaf and Cornucopia wall hanging up in the den.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

On the top of the cabinet is the Anita’s Arrowhead Mini Quilt, some ceramic pumpkins and orange candles. The ceramic turkey is the perfect fall color for now, so he gets to come out earlier than the others. Also, he was a thrift store find last summer and I hadn’t packed him up.

Decorating for Autumn ~ From My Carolina Home

So, that is where I am for now.  The big dining room table isn’t set yet, and I’ll save that tablescape for a bit later.  I am really sewing like mad, trying to finish off the projects that I am going to have for the event next month.  I know, I am teasing you.  I just don’t want to talk about it yet, but I promise you will have fun.  Look for a big announcement post on Friday.   I also want to get the veranda looking more fall-like, and I need a few pumpkins and mums to complete it.  Plus I need to clean up the detritus of summer.  So, more later.

One more thing, the winner of the drawing for the Birds in the Air book…

random4466

was number 44, Mary!  Mary said  ‘Enjoyed reading your frank reviews. I look forward to reading Birds in the Air and A Vintage Affair.”.  Mary was sent an email last night to let her know.  Congratulations, Mary!!

Are you decorating for fall now?


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Help for the Humane Society

Want a way to recycle and use up fabrics, batting and scraps along with some other things that would otherwise go to a landfill?  I have a project for you that is fast, easy, and will clean out your sewing room in a hurry.  Rural counties are always in need of donations to help with their work saving animals that need homes.  The farther away from a larger town, the more they need help.  In several of the rural counties in Western North Carolina, their entire budget for the year doesn’t cover the costs of caring for the animals.  As a result, they are happy to have little extras for the dogs and cats.  I spent two afternoons making dog beds and crate mats to take to the humane society groups needing the most help.  These are ridiculously simple and will clean out all the bits and pieces you want.  Start with those orphan fabrics in your stash, the ones you’ve had for years and still cannot find a project for. Sew three sides, and fill with batting scraps.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Crate sizes used by most humane groups are 12×18, 18×24, 24×30, and 36×42.  Crate mats can be these sizes, or anything close will do.  Smaller ones need smaller flatter crate mats, just a little something for a cat or dog to lie on while being transported. After inserting a few layers of batting, just turn the raw edge to the inside and sew the opening closed with a topstitch. Sometimes I add a little stitching in the center to keep the batting pieces from shifting. OK, so that’s two.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Then I gathered up some old t-shirts. These have some stain on them that won’t come out in the wash. I cannot wear them anymore, but the fabric is fine. Trust me the dogs won’t mind!

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

See that tomato stain?  Nothing has taken it out over several washings with pretreating and Oxyclean.  But, it won’t be seen in the final bed. I turned the t-shirts inside out, and marked a line across the shirt under the sleeves to sew on.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Sew on the line. Do not cut off the top.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Just turn right side out, and include the sleeves and neckline inside as more stuffing.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Because these are heavy knits, I can fill them with all the bits and scraps that I would usually have to throw away. If you save these in bags, you will be surprised at how much you have after just a couple of weeks – enough to fill a dog bed easily.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

I keep a bag hanging off a closet door near the cutting table, and just throw bits in it as I cut, trim, and square up blocks. Bits like this, the edge of batting and fabric that I trim off a quilt after quilting. I cut away the part that is usable again, saving large pieces of fabric and batting aside, but those strips of fabric and batting that are sewn together go into the scrap bag.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

I had a couple of pillows I made years ago that were stuffed with fiberfill. It is amazing how fluffy it will get if you pull out the old stuffing, and pull it apart with your fingers. It will go a long way in a dog bed, and the dogs will be very happy to have the softness and will not care that it has been in a pillow before.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

OK, so nicely stuff the t-shirts, then sew the bottom closed with a topstitch.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

They might be a bit ruffly around the edge, but that is OK.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Continue for all the old t-shirts you have. Easy sewing because the bottom edge isn’t a raw edge, you can just topstitch.  If you have a knit stitch, you could use that if you wanted to.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

And, voila! Dog beds! These were delivered last month.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Next week, I’ll show you another idea for pet beds to help our humane societies. Update – click on More Recycling and Repurposing.

So, do you have old t-shirts to turn into something useful?

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How to Re-cover an Ironing Board

Ironing board covers do wear out regularly, and need replacing. If you have a standard board that most people have, just buying a new cover is easy. But, my board is a specialty shape that is no longer made. It is larger than the standard board, with an elongated end for ironing in the round, like sleeves or yokes.  This is the second time I have had to re-cover it.  The last time was about 10 years ago. A dear quilter friend of mine has a large rectangle made of wood that is covered in this manner and fits over the standard board with some pieces underneath to keep it from sliding. Both boards are covered in the same way and it is easy to do. If you want a larger ironing surface, now is the time to make it bigger and more useful.  You can add a wood piece to your board, just nail it in place, or use screws if you have one of the older metal mesh boards. After years of ironing quilt blocks and pieced elements, mostly in the same spot, the fabric on my board finally got brittle and began to scorch. Then it began tearing. Naturally, every time I tried to iron in that spot, the iron would catch on the edge and make the tear worse.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Underneath, the muslin liner was scorching too. It was also very brittle and threatened to come apart any minute.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

I purchased the silver ironing fabric at the fabric store in a long enough length to cover the board in one piece with plenty left over. For my board, this was two yards.  For yours, buy the length of your board plus about 12 inches.  The fabric is 42 inches wide, so that was more than enough.  You’ll also need muslin for a liner, two or three layers of cotton batting, and a staple gun, provided your board is particle board or wood.  This method will not work on a metal board.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

I started by flipping the board upside down on the floor, and pulling off the old cover.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Pulling off the old silver layer, you can see how the muslin liner is deteriorating.  Remove the old muslin liner and old batting.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Remove any old staples or other fasteners that would get in the way of the new cover.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

I layered the new cover elements on the floor wrong side up, with the board in the middle, starting with the silver cloth, silver side down. I used the silver ironing cloth, a layer of muslin to hold the batting, and two layers of cotton batting. I did reuse the thin foam layer as it was still in good shape. What you use can be tailored to your needs, one more layer of batting if you don’t have foam, or just two layers of batting alone. I like a bit of padding when I am ironing, but not so much that it is difficult to get a good crease when I need one.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Fold the larger end (if you have a difference in the size of the ends, if not just start with one end) over the board and place a few staples in to hold all the layers in place.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Now fold the opposite end over to the backside, and pull it tight. Staple in place.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

If the layering is too thick, cut away the excess batting under the silver cloth and muslin.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Now do the center of the long sides. Start with one side, then pull opposite side tight and staple.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

When both ends and both sides are done, move to the corners or curves. Make pleats in the fabric to take up the extra, and staple them down, pulling the fabric tight. Distribute the fullness equally around the edge to smooth out the edge.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Keep working around the board until all the corners and curves are done. This is easier to do on a curve that goes outward from the center. It takes a bit more care for a curve that go inward like I have in the middle of this board. Just keep working the fabric, stapling it down as you go.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

When it is all stapled, cut away the excess fabric near, but not next to, the staples. Leave about an inch of fabric away from the staples to maintain the integrity of the fabric.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

All done, now there is a nice new surface ready for any pressing duty, and will last a long time.

How to Recover an Ironing Board ~ From My Carolina Home

Keep the leftover silver fabric, it is perfect for potholders.  More quilting and sewing coming up!

Click on Autumn Jubilee for the kickoff post to a month long event with giveaways in October 2016!

Have you ever re-covered your ironing board?

 

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