From My Carolina Home

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More Recycling and Repurposing

So, last weekend we made beds and mats for the humane society, and today will be more using up some other things you may have around the house to make more.  DH bought a new pillow for himself, and wanted to throw the old one away.  Of course, I couldn’t let him do that.  The fiberfill in his old pillow was perfectly fine for a dog bed, just pull away any fiberfill that looks dirty or stained after washing.  I pulled away just a bit of the top layer on the surface of the pillow stuffing, the edges and middle looked clean.  Then, I pulled out an old sheet that will never get used for quilt backing.  I cut it up into rectangles, and serged three edges.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

I used the serger for really only one main reason, to use the machine. Any machine needs to be used regularly to maintain it in working order. Plus, I have lots of thread for it!

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

But, just use your regular machine if you don’t have a serger. Sew three edges and part of the fourth leaving an opening for turning.  Stuff softly, then topstitch the edge closed.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

That old pillow will fill a bunch of dog beds.  The fiberfill gets very fluffy when pulled apart.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Smaller pieces of batting can be folded into the right size to fill a crate mat.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Just start with the size piece of fabric you want, then place the folded batting on top, trimming off any excess.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Sew the edges leaving an opening for turning. Roll the batting, and insert, then unroll inside for a flatter mat. This mat is 12 x 18 inches.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Then I had two pieces left over 10 x 16, those will be fine. I lay batting on the sewn cover and trimmed it to fit.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Then, I had little batting pieces like these left over.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Which turned into quite a fluffy stuffing when pulled apart with my hands.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

So, one pillow, one king size sheet, and some leftover batting scraps turned into this!

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Seven dog beds and two crate mats ready for a sweet dog or cat to use while waiting for a forever home. I cleared out a bunch of stuff from my sewing room between today’s project and last weekend’s beds, all from things that might have just been thrown away otherwise. Recycle and reuse.  Old pillowcases would make quick beds too.  And as reader Jeanne observed, an old hole filled blanket can be cut up for stuffing too. It is a win-win for me and the animals!

Do you have old pillows, pillow cases, blankets and sheets to recycle? What might you do with them?

 

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Help for the Humane Society

Want a way to recycle and use up fabrics, batting and scraps along with some other things that would otherwise go to a landfill?  I have a project for you that is fast, easy, and will clean out your sewing room in a hurry.  Rural counties are always in need of donations to help with their work saving animals that need homes.  The farther away from a larger town, the more they need help.  In several of the rural counties in Western North Carolina, their entire budget for the year doesn’t cover the costs of caring for the animals.  As a result, they are happy to have little extras for the dogs and cats.  I spent two afternoons making dog beds and crate mats to take to the humane society groups needing the most help.  These are ridiculously simple and will clean out all the bits and pieces you want.  Start with those orphan fabrics in your stash, the ones you’ve had for years and still cannot find a project for. Sew three sides, and fill with batting scraps.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Crate sizes used by most humane groups are 12×18, 18×24, 24×30, and 36×42.  Crate mats can be these sizes, or anything close will do.  Smaller ones need smaller flatter crate mats, just a little something for a cat or dog to lie on while being transported. After inserting a few layers of batting, just turn the raw edge to the inside and sew the opening closed with a topstitch. Sometimes I add a little stitching in the center to keep the batting pieces from shifting. OK, so that’s two.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Then I gathered up some old t-shirts. These have some stain on them that won’t come out in the wash. I cannot wear them anymore, but the fabric is fine. Trust me the dogs won’t mind!

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

See that tomato stain?  Nothing has taken it out over several washings with pretreating and Oxyclean.  But, it won’t be seen in the final bed. I turned the t-shirts inside out, and marked a line across the shirt under the sleeves to sew on.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Sew on the line. Do not cut off the top.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Just turn right side out, and include the sleeves and neckline inside as more stuffing.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Because these are heavy knits, I can fill them with all the bits and scraps that I would usually have to throw away. If you save these in bags, you will be surprised at how much you have after just a couple of weeks – enough to fill a dog bed easily.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

I keep a bag hanging off a closet door near the cutting table, and just throw bits in it as I cut, trim, and square up blocks. Bits like this, the edge of batting and fabric that I trim off a quilt after quilting. I cut away the part that is usable again, saving large pieces of fabric and batting aside, but those strips of fabric and batting that are sewn together go into the scrap bag.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

I had a couple of pillows I made years ago that were stuffed with fiberfill. It is amazing how fluffy it will get if you pull out the old stuffing, and pull it apart with your fingers. It will go a long way in a dog bed, and the dogs will be very happy to have the softness and will not care that it has been in a pillow before.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

OK, so nicely stuff the t-shirts, then sew the bottom closed with a topstitch.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

They might be a bit ruffly around the edge, but that is OK.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Continue for all the old t-shirts you have. Easy sewing because the bottom edge isn’t a raw edge, you can just topstitch.  If you have a knit stitch, you could use that if you wanted to.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

And, voila! Dog beds! These were delivered last month.

Dog Beds Recycling Scraps

Next week, I’ll show you another idea for pet beds to help our humane societies. Update – click on More Recycling and Repurposing.

So, do you have old t-shirts to turn into something useful?

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Christmas in July! Sewing Kit Tutorial

Today I kickoff a Christmas in July Event at From My Carolina Home!  Get ready for 12 days of ideas, tutorials, giveaways, downloads and fun on my blog PLUS a quilt along over at a blog hop with more blogs to visit full of ideas.  On this post, I’ll show you a tutorial for a great little jewelry case or sewing kit, something to make in multiples for holiday gifts.  Are you ready?  Let’s get inspired! Read all the way to the end for a special surprise!

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

You’ll need:
1/2 yard of fashion fabric (in the tutorial, the snapdragon fabric) for the outside
1/2 yard of lining fabric (in the tutorial, the pink fabric) for the inside
1 yard cording, cut into two 18-inch pieces
1 3-inch plastic canvas circle
Optional – fusible interfacing 15 inch square

First make your pattern. You’ll need circles of fabric, so I begin with folding a piece of paper into fourths. Make 2. Measure out 7-1/2 inches from the center on the larger, and 4-1/2 inches from the center on the smaller, in several places. Draw a quarter circle line from edge to edge to make two circles, one 15 inches in diameter and one 9 inches in diameter.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Cut out your circles.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Using each pattern circle, cut one fashion fabric and one lining fabric.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Optional, if you like your case to have a bit more body, iron on fusible interfacing to the back of the fashion fabric.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Measure in from one edge on the larger 15-inch fashion fabric circle 1-1/2 inches and make a buttonhole one inch in length.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Make another one on the opposite edge of the same piece of fabric.  Cut both buttonholes open.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Place the large circles right sides together and sew all the way around the edge. Yes, all the way, do not leave any opening for turning. Repeat with the smaller circles, right sides together.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Fold the sewn circles into fourths to find the exact center. Mark a one inch line on the edge in the center (1/2 inch on either side of the center point) on the lining.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Cut a slit in the LINING ONLY. Don’t get scared, it will get covered up. Just be careful to only cut the lining. Repeat for the small circle.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Clip the curves on the edges all the way around both circles.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Turn right side out through the slit.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Smooth out the edges, I like to use a chopstick for this.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Iron both to sharply crease the edges.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Fold the larger circle into fourths and finger press to find the exact center. Place the plastic canvas circle in the center on the lining side over the slit, making sure the center of the canvas is on the center of the larger circle.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Fold the smaller circle into fourths, lining side out and place on the plastic canvas to find the center.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Open out the small circle over the plastic canvas, lining sides together, pin around the plastic canvas through all the layers.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Sew through all the layers around the canvas circle. Do not sew through the canvas, just around the edge of it. This will encase the canvas in the bottom providing a firm base and cover both slits in the lining fabric.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Beginning at the sewing line in the middle, sew spokes out to the edge of the smaller circle. Sew four spokes, one each pointing north, south, east and west (or like a clock face 12, 3, 6, and 9).  Do not sew through the plastic canvas.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Add four more spokes of sewing to make eight pockets.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

I hope you see the stitching here to create the pockets in the smaller circle.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Now, sew a line around the outer edge of the larger circle about 1/2-inch in from the edge to make the top ruffle. Be sure to keep this line of sewing to the outside of the buttonholes.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Sew a second line of stitching about one inch further in, this time going to the inside of the buttonholes.  This will create a channel for the drawstrings.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Using a bodkin, or other means, thread the cording through one of the buttonholes, all the way around the channel and back out through the same buttonhole.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Tie the ends together in a knot.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Repeat with the other piece of cording using the opposite buttonhole.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

I put a dab of frey check on each knot and clip off the taped ends.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Pull on both cords at the same time to close the bag.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Give it empty for use as a jewelry case.  Earrings are kept together in the pockets.  Since the bottoms of the pockets end at the plastic canvas liner, they are flat instead of cone shaped.  This makes it easy to reach in and get your items.  The sturdy base can hold several pieces as well.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Another idea, fill it with sewing goodies for a wonderful sewing kit.  For travel to classes, or just to keep on hand, a kit with the basics we use all the time will be appreciated.  Needles, pretty scissors and Aurifil threads are always welcome to a quilter or sewist.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

Even more fun, make one with sewing motif fabrics!

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

This one has a gold lining fabric.

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home

You can make your own sewing kit with this black background fabric, available in my Etsy store, or use the scissor fabric also available at a wholesale price. Filled with sewing goodies they make great gifts.  A yard will provide enough of the pretty fabric for three sewing kits, just add one yard of lining solid in your choice of colors.  There are plenty of choices with this adorable print.

Sewingmotif

SimplyColorful-Large-Outside SimplyColorful-Large-Inside

To win this set of 12 V&Co Simply Color Aurifil thread, visit the Aurifil website at http://www.aurifil.com/, check out Auriworld, see the designers and collections, or visit the blog, then come back and leave a comment on this post with your favorite Aurifil thread collection or designer, or if you decided to follow them via any of their social networks like Pinterest.   International entries are welcome, Aurifil will ship anywhere in the world. You may leave a second comment and entry if you follow my blog and just say how you follow me. I’ll draw the winner on July 24th, so you have plenty of time to enter. Good luck!
Update – Drawing has been held and the winner has been sent an email.

12DAYSOFCIJ2016bannerMORE FUN!! Hop over to Confessions of A Fabric Addict to see more Christmas In July ideas, begin a quilt along for a Christmas quilt, and see the other bloggers on the hop over the next 12 days.   Lots more projects are planned for the hop you won’t want to miss.  Fellow blogger on the hop today is Sharon Vrooman who has another Christmas project – click on Vroomans Quilts to see the feather trees.

And come back here for more ideas throughout the house tomorrow.  Linking up with some of the great parties on my party page.  Also sharing at …

Bag It! at Elm Street Quilts Bag Tutorials

Sewing Kit | From My Carolina Home


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Quilted Travel Bag – The Scrappy Project Finish

I finally finished the scrappy project, and it became a travel bag.  It has a wonderful snap frame closure that I purchased from Ghees.  After I finalized the design and ordered the frame, I contacted Linda McGhee and she generously has provided both a coupon for all my readers and a giveaway prize! Read all the way to the end of the post for details.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

I like to carry books with me when I travel, and I designed this bag to have pockets inside and out that will hold a large book, or two!  Or your laptop!

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

You may remember that I started with a mess of scraps, orphan blocks, half-square triangles and odd ball pieces.  You can see the piecing and quilting of these elements in my posts -Scrappy Projects Part One, Part Two, and Part Three.  I decided on the project design in general, and it was going to require all the elements to be finished before assembly.  So, when we left off, I had made the binding and was working on doing the finishing work by hand.  Here’s what you need to do this project.

Body of bag – 24 x 36 inches, bound and finished
Straps – 2 straps 2 x 15 inches each, bound and finished
Pockets – 2 pocket pieces  10 x 16 inches each, bound and finished
Straight Hex Frame 18-inch length

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Begin by turning down one 24-inch edge of the body 2 inches and pin in place.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Stitch down in the ditch on the binding.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Put another line of stitching at the top, about 1/2 inch in, creating a channel for the frame.  Repeat for the opposite side.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Stop stitching at the binding, it is too hard to stitch across that many layers and it isn’t needed.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Next, place the straps below the channel, allowing about 2 inches for stitching, about 7 inches in from either side.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Top stitch in place in the ditch, and across the strap, taking care not to stitch the channel. I usually place an X in stitching through the stitched ‘square’ on the strap for extra strength. Repeat for both ends of both straps.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

On the outside, place one pocket piece below the straps and stitch the sides and bottom, leaving the top open.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

On the opposite end, on the inside, place the pocket below the stitching for the handles.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Topstitch in the ditch on the sides  and across the bottom, leaving the top open.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Because all the edges are finished, the bag is assembled with the seam allowance on the outside, creating a piping look.  So, fold the body in half, meeting the top edges, WRONG sides together.  Pin generously so the binding/piping stays aligned, and stitch in the ditch from the bottom of the bag to just below the channel.  Be careful not to stitch the channel.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Now, you are ready to insert the frame.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

On the frame, you’ll notice that the ends of the pieces are not the same.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Match up one two-prong end with a one-prong end, and insert the pin.  A pair of pliers is useful to squeeze the pieces aligning the loops for the pin.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Now, insert the frame into the channels, making sure the pin is pointing to the bottom.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Gather the purse body onto the frame.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Using a pair of pliers, align the other end and insert the pin pointing to the bottom.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Redistribute the fullness.  The backing fabric has become contrast detailing.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

You can stop here if you like, the snap frame will hold the bag open when you want it to do so.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

And keep it closed when you need it to stay closed.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

If you like boxed corners, measure two inches in on the corners, aligning the binding seam in the middle.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Sew across at the 2-inch mark.  I added a button for a little detail. Then, tack the corner up by hand.

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Now for the exciting part, you can get a discount at Ghee’s until the end of the month! Take a 20% discount off your entire order of $20.00 or more!  The discount code is  mch316  and is case sensitive. See the new website at www.ghees.com. Code is good through March 31, 2016. I am not receiving any compensation from Ghees, I am just a satisfied customer.

PLUS, one lucky reader will receive a $25 gift certificate to Ghees, so you can get this frame, or anything else you like! Just visit the Ghee’s website, and then come back and leave a comment here.  I’ll draw for a winner late Thursday evening, then announce the winner on Friday’s Scrap Dance Tango step 3 post.  Update – The winner of the gift certificate is Kathy in WV!  Congratulations, Kathy!!

Quilted Travel Bag ~ From My Carolina Home

Have you ever used a snap frame like this?  What might you get with a gift certificate?

Sharing with the parties on my link party page, and …

Oh Scrap!

Bag It! at Elm Street Quilts Bag Tutorials

Orphan Blocks Scrapalooza


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Quilted Art Project

This project will be a Slow Stitching project over the next few weeks.  Today, I’ll show the overall plan, and will update as I get farther along.  Someone asked me recently how many projects I have going on at any one time, and the answer is usually two or three.  I’ll have something next to my chair to fiddle with while watching TV, a quilt on the longarm to quilt, and a project on the sewing table.  Right now, I have two at the sewing table, as I am still making units for Scrap Dance Tango, and I am starting another charity quilt.  I have a lovely stained glass quilt on the longarm, and two more charity quilts in the queue. This project has made it up to the hand work stage.  I started with these lovely fabrics.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I like the purple and green. This will go in the sewing room when I am done. Isn’t this a cute sewing print?

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then I brought out some lace doilies and pieces.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Rummaging through the button boxes….

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I pulled out purple, green, white, and yellow buttons. I had some pearls, large beads and flowers I could use too.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then I dug into the silk ribbon box…

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

and found some appropriate colors there too.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Next, the seed bead stash.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

The finished art piece will be mounted in a giant quilting frame. After sewing the three pieces of fabric together, I marked the outline of the hoop to define the art space.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I loaded it onto the longarm, and auditioned various colors of thread.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then, it was quilted with a pansy pantograph.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Ultimately, I just quilted the whole piece instead of just the part inside my chalked outline.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I decided on these three doilies, can you believe I have a purple one?

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I pinned them down, and began the hand stitching to secure all three in place.

Stitching Doilies ~ From My Carolina Home

The first two are done, and I have the third one to go.

Stitching Doilies ~ From My Carolina Home

Next up will be to start placing buttons, beads, and silk ribbon embroidery. I am going to let this evolve as it will, no real plan right now.  Linking up with Slow Stitching Sunday last fall was very motivating to get the ornaments done.   I plan to do it again, in the hope this will be the same, making progress of some kind each week.

It is cold now, and I wouldn’t mind one more snow to keep me home sewing for a day. If you are in the mood for a new print, click on My Etsy Store, I have just added some new fabrics from my trip last Friday.  I found a couple of really cute sewing prints I loved, but had to buy the whole bolt.  I am selling the extra yardage to my readers at a discount over retail.  Look for some new projects using these prints soon.  I am also selling some of my quilting library on this post – HERE.

Do you work on intricate projects over time?

 

Sharing with the linky’s on my sidebar.


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Scrappy Project Update Part 3

The scrappy project moves along slowly. After I finished the quilting on the patched piece, I thought for quite a while as to what I wanted to do with it. It wouldn’t work as a quilt, it was too much of a mish-mash. The other thing I had in mind was to do something more complex and challenging.

Scrappy Project | From My Carolina Home

So, I decided to make a travel bag, for whatever I needed to travel with. It could be sewing supplies to a meeting, needlecraft for a class, or carry-on to an airplane with necessities. Now, the question was, how to do that. I did figure out a plan, and I’ll start with this post to share that. I’ll finish with a future post and show the finished project. I ordered the hardware I wanted, and it came last week, so all I need is time.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I decided on size for the overall bag and cut that piece. I also cut strap and pocket pieces.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I’ll have the outer patched piece, with the green lining as an accent.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Now for the challenging part. My design is going to go together a bit differently, and I need to finish all those raw edges first. So, I started making binding.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

All together, the total strips were about 420 inches.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I began sewing the binding strips onto the individual pieces.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

The idea is that the binding will become another accent, like piping.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

All the sewing of the binding was done for every piece.

Scrappy Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Yesterday, while watching TV, I began the slow stitching of all that binding to the backside of the pieces. Once I finish that, the assembly of the final design should go pretty quick. After I ordered the hardware, I contacted the company and will have a special surprise for you all on that post, so stay tuned!

Are you working on any UFOs?

 

Sharing with the great linky parties on my sidebar, click on the icons to visit them.


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Scraps – Using Up Some HSTs

Going through the scrap pile to make order out of chaos, I found a good number of half square triangles I could use in a project. Remember this mess? There were a lot more half square triangles in that pile than I remembered ever having.

Scraps 1

I pulled them all out, and squared them all to the same size.  I found a group with all the same light fabric, so I pulled those out first.

Scraps 2 HSTs

Then, I started playing around with laying them out to see what would happen.  The diamond shape was pretty easy to get, and I remembered seeing a quilt somewhere, at a show or on the internet, of an offset diamond that runs off the edge. So I tried that.

Scraps Offset Diamond 3

Yes, I like that! But I knew with a limited number of prints, it would be important to keep them all straight.  I don’t have any more to of that background print to make more HSTs, or at least I don’t think I do, LOL!!   I started by sewing each row independently.

Scraps Offset Diamond 4

Then I numbered the rows with little bits of paper held on with a pin on the left side of each row.

Scraps Offset Diamond 5

Then I pressed all the even rows one way and the odd rows the other so the seams would nest.

Scraptastic offset another row

Here it is so far, I need to look at some borders now to make it lap size for a charity quilt.

Scraps Offset Diamond 7

I think I have enough HSTs that I found while pressing to get one more row too.  So we will call this a work in progress, more later!  See the finish HERE.

Linking up…
Sew Fresh Quilts . WIPWed