From My Carolina Home

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A Radical Idea to Handle a Wavy Border

It must just be my year for bad borders.  I am not going to reveal where this particular quilt came from, I work with several charity quilter groups to do Quilts of Valor, and I do not want to embarrass anyone.  I am reasonably sure that this piecer doesn’t read my blog, and I want to show you all one more radical idea to take up a mess of a border.  The quilt is a tumbler style, which has a problem to begin with as the sides are often on the bias and more prone to stretching out of shape. A lovely wide dark blue backing was provided with the top.

QOV Tumbler 1

Just laying it out on the backing to check the size started to point to an issue with the border, actually three borders.  The blue here on the edge is the backing.

QOV Tumbler 2

Sigh. I know you all are getting as tired of bad borders as I am, but this one took the cake.

QOV Tumbler Fix 3

Once again, look at the extra fabric in this! But, it goes one step further.

QOV Tumbler Fix 4

Here is the most graphic example I have ever seen where the outer edge was so obviously larger than the inner edge. The inner red border was this way.

QOV Tumbler Fix 6

And the middle black border was also this way, adding fabric to the outer edge.

QOV Tumbler Fix 7

On both sides.

QOV Tumbler Fix 8

Which gave us this on the outer beige border.

QOV Tumbler Fix 5

There was no way this was going to work in, or quilt out. So, I decided to do a radical thing, something I only considered because it was a charity quilt.  If someone had been paying for quilting, I would have let the quilter have it back to fix the borders.  I pulled it off the frame, laid it on the cutting table and marked darts in the borders on the back side. The darts went all the way through the three borders, decreasing to nothing at the inner sewn edge of the red border. The amount was determined by what was hanging over a straight line on my cutting board when I lined up the center section folded in half.   It doesn’t seem like much here, but it is almost an inch of fullness coming out at the outer edge. I marked the dart with a pencil line…

QOV Tumbler Fix 9

then took it to the sewing machine and sewed darts on all four sides.

QOV Tumbler Fix 12

Then I took it back to the cutting table, and cut off the uneven edges with additional excess fabric. This will give me some room to push a bit on it at the corners to accommodate some of the remaining fullness, and stitch it straight.

QOV Tumbler Fix 10

I pressed the darts to one side on the backside first, then on the right side to set in the seam. It worked nicely.

QOV Tumbler Fix 16

Here is one on the other side.  Now it lays flat.

QOV Tumbler Fix 13

I loaded it back on the frame, and stitched the top edge down. Much better!  Even though you can still see the ruffle effect at the seam line between the beige and black borders.

QOV Tumbler 3

I thought that since I was doing more Quilts of Valor now, I should have a patriotic pantograph, so I got this one from Urban Elementz called Stars and Bars. It looked great on the website, but after using it, it isn’t going to be a favorite. It is too linear, doesn’t interlock and is a bit difficult to get the stars to close.

QOV Tumbler 4

Later as I was quilting, I started doing the stars by crossing the point where it joins the stripe lines to ensure that the points closed. The panto has the stars corners rounded off, and I kept trying to make them more pointy. Consistency was a problem for me.

QOV Tumbler 9

QOV Tumbler 11

After the quilting was done, the darts are barely noticeable.

QOV Tumbler 13

Looks pretty good all quilted up.

QOV Tumbler 14

Even the borders are looking better.

QOV Tumbler 16

So, it’s all good.  If you are a new quilter, a self taught quilter, or you’ve never seen how to properly apply borders and why it is important to do them correctly, they are not hard.  Just see my tutorial on Quilt Borders Understanding the Why.  It goes through not only the ‘how’ of proper borders, but the ‘why’ and what happens when they are put on by the slap and sew method.  The quilt I just loaded is perfect, with outstandingly perfectly applied borders and is flat as the proverbial pancake.  I’ll show it to you all when it is done, but is a joy to quilt!!  Ask your program chairperson at your local guild to do a program on borders, and feel free to put the link in your newsletters to spread the word.

What are you working on now?


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Be My Neighbor Block 11

Getting back to the previous block on the Be My Neighbor quilt along, I said last month that I wanted to make these little houses into birdhouses. After that post, I was gifted a lovely piece of fabric by Mary who blogs at Needled Mom, (thanks again!!)  The sizes of the birds was perfect for this block, and I used my square-up ruler to mark the fabric so I could fussy cut the exact size I needed with the birds in the center.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

There were more than six motifs, so I had a hard time choosing which ones to use.  I went for the ones with nests first, then had to adjust to get six full motifs.  I couldn’t get the robin and nest because it was too close to the others where I needed the extra space to get the full square.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

So, here are the final cuts, along with the other elements of the block.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

There were only a few squares to mark for the roof sections this time.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Being careful to get the correct sections on the top and bottom of the bird squares, chain piecing made construction quick.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Little roofs went on the birdhouses quickly too.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Laying out the units, I made sure the colors of the birds were distributed nicely, and sewed the rows. At this point I was cautiously optimistic that this block would go together smoothly.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Rows pressed, and assembled, and YES!!! I made a block without ripping out a single seam, whoopee!!

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Here’s a look at each of the bird blocks, starting with the cardinals.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Cedar Waxwings are seldom seen here, but once I did see an entire flock of them in a tree at our house. There must have been four or five dozen, a huge flock. This little square brings back that memory.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

This one is a red breasted grosbeak, I haven’t ever seen one of these in real life.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

We have bluebirds here, but I don’t see them often. I bought mealworms for them and DH put them in the feeder, then didn’t see any bluebirds for months!

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

This one is a yellow warbler. I would have loved to get the goldfinches on the fabric, but I couldn’t have them and the cardinals too.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

I think this is supposed to be a purple finch.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

One last look at the finished block.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Laying out the row, I had Block 12 from last time, so the row blocks were ready to assemble.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Getting closer to the end of this, just four more blocks to go and then sashing.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

I know I have shared this before, but I was at it again with this block. I use the ends of my longarm bobbins to wind bobbins for the DSM. And I use the ends of bobbins from my DSM as the top thread for scrappy blocks. It helps to use up those bits and ends, and free up bobbins to reload with different colors.

Re-using ends of bobbins at From My Carolina Home

If you are just finding this, all the patterns are available on Bear Creek Quilting’s free pattern area for Moda Be My Neighbor blocks, click HERE for the pattern downloads.  Three rows finished, and I like the lighter colors.  I wish now that I had done all the sky fabrics the same, but oh well, not going to rip it out!!

Be My Neighbor Three Rows Complete at From My Carolina Home

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.

My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.   The pattern steps will remain up until July 2017 then removed and published in my Craftsy store.  See my Craftsy store for more of my scrappy patterns to use up your stash bits. Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.

Are you quilting today?

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Quilting the On-Point Quilt

Quilting this violet and green on-point setting quilt was finished on a rainy afternoon.  Outside is so much green now, and getting more green by the day.  I usually unplug the longarm during thunderstorms as I don’t fully trust the surge protector, but a light gentle rain makes for a cozy day in the basement to sew.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I did have a fix to make on the backing. I picked a big piece of dark green out of the stash, cut it in half and seamed it together  lengthwise to make it wide enough. Unfortunately, there was this little bite out of one edge.  Naturally I didn’t find it until the other side and the rest of this side was pinned to the leaders.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

This is a problem when loading a backing on a longarm. That unsecured edge will allow the backing edge to sag and create an uneven pull across the backing, that might result in puckers or pleats on the back. So, I pinned a bit of fabric in the open space to allow the edge to be secured to the leader. Pinning was enough, I didn’t need to take it off and sew this little patch in.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

So all loaded, and now to do the stand and stare. I was thinking that it would really be special to quilt feather wreaths in the solid purple print squares, and some other freehand motifs in the four patches.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Ultimately I went with a pantograph again.  I had two more quilts in the queue and needed to get this one done and off the frame.  The pantograph has a feather design, and looked nice in the border squares.  I used a darker thread to make the quilting pop in the light areas.  An adjustment to the bobbin tension after this row tightened up the stitches.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Then in the purple print, it made a nice texture.  I used polyester thread on the top in a golden brown, and Bottom Line in the bobbin.  The batting is Warm and Natural.  The pantograph is called Feelin’ Groovy designed by Michelle Wyman and Terri Watson of Heart and Soul Quilts, and sold by Willow Leaf Studio.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The darker thread color shows nicely in the white.  I like the density of this pantograph too.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Finishing up the quilting, the feather design quilts up nicely.

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

Cutting off the excess after the quilting was complete, the dark green had enough left over to make binding.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

And, all done, ready to donate.

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

Now, I just need to decide where it will go. It is lap quilt size, so it could go to either the senior center or the chemo center. It might come down to which friend comes over next, LOL!!

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

I have another QOV to do, and one for a foster care center, both large quilts that will take some time.  Luckily, they both will use pantographs too.  I’ll show those to you soon.

Have you finished a project recently?

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.


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On Point Charity Quilt

Sometimes just playing with scraps can produce something useful. Pulling out the scrap bag, I was looking for some pastels and florals to add to my Be My Neighbor fabric pull, when I ran across these half square triangles left over from another project.  These squares are 5-1/2 inches.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I really had no advance idea of what to do with them. Maybe some four patches would be good. So, I cut some 5-1/2-inch white squares to go with them.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Sewing the HSTs to the white squares, pressed to the solid white, the units were nested and chain pieced.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

So, now what. I had six four patch units, each finishing at 10-inches, not enough to make a quilt.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Well, maybe set them on point with large squares to make a decent size. So I pulled out a complementary purple print and cut large 10-1/2-inch squares and some triangles to set the four patches on point.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

All together, it just seemed to call for an interesting border, not just another print.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I did think that a first border of the same purple print would make the four-patch units float in the center, so I added one, 3 inches wide.  Then, I had these 5-inch yellow squares left over from another project, and yellow goes well with purple. I cut the same size squares of the light green, and lay them out to be sure the dimensions would match the border requirement. In a few spots, I sewed the seams a bit larger to take up the excess.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Now it was a good size for a charity quilt, about 45 x 55.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

For continuity, I added a 2-inch final border of the same violet print as the middle HSTs.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I found some backing fabric in dark green, and laid it on the longarm to measure out batting.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Loading it up, now I had to decide on a pantograph. I wanted something kind of girly with the flowers.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I’ll show you the finish next time. Have you ever built a quilt from just bits, letting it evolve as it goes?

See the finish here – Quilting the On Point Quilt

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Crazy Mom Quilts

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.


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Landrum Quilt Show 2017

This past week I attended the Landrum Quilt Show, and what a great time!  Lots of quilts, wonderful vendors, a whole room of used magazines and books at ridiculously low prices, and raffles too!  Couldn’t ask for more.  The quilt show is held at one of the local high schools, in the gym, so I could go up the bleachers (only for you dear readers) to get a birds-eye view of the show. There just isn’t enough space to show you the whole show, don’t worry I won’t try! I will highlight a few of the quilts I found interesting. Every quilt there was applause-worthy, so choosing just a few was difficult.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

This quilt, called Blooming Hearts, was pieced by Joan Powell and quilted by Roz Hemberger. The heart blocks are set on point, then hand appliqued. The feathers around the blocks were really interesting, and I suspect are freehand quilted.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

This quilt called Bee Creative was adorable, with hand embroidered blocks, all with bees. It was pieced and embroidered by Karen Cummings and quilted by Lynne Hannant.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

A close up of one of the blocks shows the intricate detail, and wonderful cross hatched quilting.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

I am captivated with quilts like these with all different blocks. This one is pieced and quilted by Judith Kuntz and features not only piecing, but hand embroidery, paper piecing, applique and some fancy machine stitching.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Flame Bargello by Diane Hollis had wonderful flame quilting on the ombre fabrics, and note that the beaded blue ribbon of piecing is offset in the black border. The combination was so interesting!

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Curved piecing got my attention here, along with the interesting flower shapes embedded in the overlapping rings. The runner was made by Laurie Blair and is called Bejewed and Bedazzled.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Here’s a close up of the interesting custom quilting, note the different motifs in different areas, stippling too.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Another beauty by Laurie Blair featured beading in the center to add dimension to the iris flower in the quilt called Star of My Garden.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Rise And Shine was a lovely clock made by Sybil Radius. Note the radiating quilting in the rays, and texture in the center.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

The variegated thread really adds another dimension to this piece, along with some thread painting.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Jar Transparency by Diane Hollis showed a wonderful choice of fabrics to create the illusion, and dimensional flowers add texture.  Note the flowers in the quilting with the straight lines.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

I liked this rooster, beautifully done by Christine Wilde in a mixture of piecing, applique and thread painting. Note that she quilted the black border in white thread to create the chicken wire.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

The Landrum show is all viewer’s choice, no judging, and here was my vote for Best in Show. It is called The Circle of Life Unfolds As The Phoenix Rises, made by Ruth Pollow. The quilting on this piece was show stopping, absolutely gorgeous.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Ms Pollow created curved window panes, each with a different design, for an overall patchwork of quilting.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

Here’s another closeup of the upper right with the Phoenix head and the sun in the quilting. Note the tiny sections of different quilting patterns around the sun. Stunning.

Landrum, NC Quilt Show 2017

I took about 70 more pictures, LOL! It was so easy as the quilts were wonderful. It was just the thing I needed to get my creative mojo back. So much so that I whipped up a table topper and finished it in just two days.  It is a Patriotic Table Topper or Wall Hanging using the Tango pattern.  Those who have purchased the Scrap Dance Tango pattern from my Craftsy store have been sent a message that there is a bonus for you!  Just go to your pattern purchases and download the bonus freebie.  Of course, if you haven’t had the pleasure of pleasure of downloading Scrap Dance Tango, you can get both at the link above.

Like the little mini quilt?  That free pattern is available here – Patriotic Star Mini Quilt.  Thanks to sharp-eyed reader Janice that caught a typo – I have corrected it.

Happy Quilting!!

What are you working on now?


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Be My Neighbor Block 12

Moving on to the next block in this quilt along, block 12 is pretty simple. I knew I could do this one in very little time, so I got out the basket of scraps and began pulling colors. I laid out the previous row so I could see what would be next to this block, and vary the colors. Purple with a floral print seemed the right choice for the large squares, and I can use the lighter purple in the nine-patch blocks.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -2

I cut most of the pieces and set them out on my sewing table for assembly. I decided to do the nine-patches using strips instead of cutting all the little 2-inch squares. Laying out the components, there were only two diagonal lines to draw this time. I chain pieced as much as I could before taking the units to the ironing board.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -4

I did the nine patch strip units and cross cut them, pressing the strips toward the green so the units would nest.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -5

Sewing more units, I looked carefully at the roof knowing that those chimneys would be a pain. So, I carefully pinned them, checked the placement, checked and repinned again.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -6

And still managed to do it wonky. Even with the quarter-inch foot and trying really hard. I can’t break the streak now, apparently.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -7

And so, I took it out and redid the seam. Twice.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -8

The third time was the charm, or at least as good as I was ever going to get it. I turned to assembling the other units.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -9

Final two seams were sewn and the block was done.  The purples really are the same bluish tone, the darker one isn’t showing true in the pictures.  The nine patch colors are pulled out of the purple floral print, and match really well.

Be My Neighbor Block 12 -10

So, those of you really sharp eyed will notice that I skipped Block 11. I have a couple of ideas of how to do that block with all the little houses, but no fabric that will suit for the large windows on each little house. My first thought is to make them all birdhouses, with fussy cut birds in each window. Problem is I do not have any bird fabric. I also thought about using food fabrics, like little farmer’s market stalls. So, I am going to look in the shops for something suitable, maybe one of these ideas or maybe something I haven’t thought about yet. I won’t be able to get to the meeting today for the group as our longarm group is meeting in Waynesville Weaverville at a new quilt shop. Maybe I can find something cute there. We’ll see!

Are you doing the quilt along? What are you working on now?

 

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Angel Quilt

Recently, a friend of mine gave me this sweet fabric. It isn’t a panel, but it has squares with angels playing in their gardens.  The soft greens and yellows with the printed purple sashing is just a charming color palette.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

There are three angel designs in the fabric.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Initially, I thought it would be a good time to practice some custom quilting, outlining the blocks and doing some feathers.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

But, loading it up, I decided just to do a pantograph and get it done for giving away.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The pantograph is a pansy with leaves, as it went with the gardening theme in the panel.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I used a light yellow thread by Essentials, with Bottom Line in the bobbin, also in yellow.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Batting is Warm and Natural. The soft colors will be nice for a little girl.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

It quilted up fast, and I was done in an afternoon.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I trimmed it so the purple sashing was relatively even.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Digging in the stash, this yellow rose fabric was perfect for the binding.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Hand stitched to the back was fast too.  The backing is a tone on tone ivory, and did well with the pale yellow Bottom Line in the bobbin.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

All done and ready for donation.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I am not sure where this one will go yet. But, I am sure it will be loved by someone soon.

Angel Quilt at From My Carolina Home

What are you working on now?

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.

 

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