From My Carolina Home

Quilting, cooking, reading books, gardening, crafting, sewing, photography and more


30 Comments

A Radical Idea to Handle a Wavy Border

It must just be my year for bad borders.  I am not going to reveal where this particular quilt came from, I work with several charity quilter groups to do Quilts of Valor, and I do not want to embarrass anyone.  I am reasonably sure that this piecer doesn’t read my blog, and I want to show you all one more radical idea to take up a mess of a border.  The quilt is a tumbler style, which has a problem to begin with as the sides are often on the bias and more prone to stretching out of shape. A lovely wide dark blue backing was provided with the top.

QOV Tumbler 1

Just laying it out on the backing to check the size started to point to an issue with the border, actually three borders.  The blue here on the edge is the backing.

QOV Tumbler 2

Sigh. I know you all are getting as tired of bad borders as I am, but this one took the cake.

QOV Tumbler Fix 3

Once again, look at the extra fabric in this! But, it goes one step further.

QOV Tumbler Fix 4

Here is the most graphic example I have ever seen where the outer edge was so obviously larger than the inner edge. The inner red border was this way.

QOV Tumbler Fix 6

And the middle black border was also this way, adding fabric to the outer edge.

QOV Tumbler Fix 7

On both sides.

QOV Tumbler Fix 8

Which gave us this on the outer beige border.

QOV Tumbler Fix 5

There was no way this was going to work in, or quilt out. So, I decided to do a radical thing, something I only considered because it was a charity quilt.  If someone had been paying for quilting, I would have let the quilter have it back to fix the borders.  I pulled it off the frame, laid it on the cutting table and marked darts in the borders on the back side. The darts went all the way through the three borders, decreasing to nothing at the inner sewn edge of the red border. The amount was determined by what was hanging over a straight line on my cutting board when I lined up the center section folded in half.   It doesn’t seem like much here, but it is almost an inch of fullness coming out at the outer edge. I marked the dart with a pencil line…

QOV Tumbler Fix 9

then took it to the sewing machine and sewed darts on all four sides.

QOV Tumbler Fix 12

Then I took it back to the cutting table, and cut off the uneven edges with additional excess fabric. This will give me some room to push a bit on it at the corners to accommodate some of the remaining fullness, and stitch it straight.

QOV Tumbler Fix 10

I pressed the darts to one side on the backside first, then on the right side to set in the seam. It worked nicely.

QOV Tumbler Fix 16

Here is one on the other side.  Now it lays flat.

QOV Tumbler Fix 13

I loaded it back on the frame, and stitched the top edge down. Much better!  Even though you can still see the ruffle effect at the seam line between the beige and black borders.

QOV Tumbler 3

I thought that since I was doing more Quilts of Valor now, I should have a patriotic pantograph, so I got this one from Urban Elementz called Stars and Bars. It looked great on the website, but after using it, it isn’t going to be a favorite. It is too linear, doesn’t interlock and is a bit difficult to get the stars to close.

QOV Tumbler 4

Later as I was quilting, I started doing the stars by crossing the point where it joins the stripe lines to ensure that the points closed. The panto has the stars corners rounded off, and I kept trying to make them more pointy. Consistency was a problem for me.

QOV Tumbler 9

QOV Tumbler 11

After the quilting was done, the darts are barely noticeable.

QOV Tumbler 13

Looks pretty good all quilted up.

QOV Tumbler 14

Even the borders are looking better.

QOV Tumbler 16

So, it’s all good.  If you are a new quilter, a self taught quilter, or you’ve never seen how to properly apply borders and why it is important to do them correctly, they are not hard.  Just see my tutorial on Quilt Borders Understanding the Why.  It goes through not only the ‘how’ of proper borders, but the ‘why’ and what happens when they are put on by the slap and sew method.  The quilt I just loaded is perfect, with outstandingly perfectly applied borders and is flat as the proverbial pancake.  I’ll show it to you all when it is done, but is a joy to quilt!!  Ask your program chairperson at your local guild to do a program on borders, and feel free to put the link in your newsletters to spread the word.

What are you working on now?


23 Comments

Dinner on the Veranda

The weather is really nice now, cool in the evenings, sometimes after an afternoon shower. I like eating outside especially when we are grilling dinner. Of course, planning for the meat and veggies to be grilled means very little cleanup in the kitchen, and more time to sit and enjoy the view. I wanted to get out the lemon plates, as I haven’t used them since last summer. That meant yellow napkins too. The little napkin rings that are yellow flower pots were perfect for this tablescape.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

I set the plate stack on my thrift store score of rattan chargers.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

I set the table early in the day, and wanted to keep the bugs off the plates and cutlery. Recently I found these vintage screen covers at the thrift stores – one each at two different stores – and snapped them up. I need four more now!! I placed the cutlery on the plate and covered them with the vintage screen covers.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

Here is the other one, with different flowers.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

For the centerpiece, I placed a little planter that was given to me by a friend inside the ceramic yellow basket. I filled it with water about half full.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

And here is how I left it until later when it was time to cook outside.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

When evening came, I cut some fresh hydrangeas and added them to the centerpiece. Lavendar and yellow go so well together.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

So the table is ready, now for the food.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

Dinner was nice rib-eye steaks with zucchini boats filled with some butter and Parmesan cheese. I put a screen over the food while the grill heated up.  We decided that we didn’t need a salad with this meal since there was more than plenty here.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

Grilled to perfection by DH resident grill-master,  and served with horseradish sauce, we had a lovely meal.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

Looking out over the valley, there is a lovely green view we enjoyed as we had our dinner.  The distant ridge is a bit hazy on this evening.  It is difficult for the camera to see both the close up green and the distant ridge at the same time.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

Later, at dusk, I attempted to get some of the hundreds of fireflies that were flashing in the trees and in the meadow.  Taking a couple of dozen photos, this was the only one that had a yellow light.  There are so many fireflies, it looks like twinkle lights on the meadow and in the dark areas of the forest.

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

I did try again later with a tripod, can you see some tiny lights near the grass here?  They are just so hard to capture!  But so pretty, softly flashing tiny yellow lights.

Fireflies at From My Carolina Home

Do you have dinner outside at your place?

Dinner on the Veranda at From My Carolina Home

Sharing

Fluster Buster

Talk of the Town

Vintage Charm

Share Your Cup

Foodie Friday at Rattlebridge Farm


25 Comments

Be My Neighbor Block 11

Getting back to the previous block on the Be My Neighbor quilt along, I said last month that I wanted to make these little houses into birdhouses. After that post, I was gifted a lovely piece of fabric by Mary who blogs at Needled Mom, (thanks again!!)  The sizes of the birds was perfect for this block, and I used my square-up ruler to mark the fabric so I could fussy cut the exact size I needed with the birds in the center.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

There were more than six motifs, so I had a hard time choosing which ones to use.  I went for the ones with nests first, then had to adjust to get six full motifs.  I couldn’t get the robin and nest because it was too close to the others where I needed the extra space to get the full square.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

So, here are the final cuts, along with the other elements of the block.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

There were only a few squares to mark for the roof sections this time.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Being careful to get the correct sections on the top and bottom of the bird squares, chain piecing made construction quick.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Little roofs went on the birdhouses quickly too.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Laying out the units, I made sure the colors of the birds were distributed nicely, and sewed the rows. At this point I was cautiously optimistic that this block would go together smoothly.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Rows pressed, and assembled, and YES!!! I made a block without ripping out a single seam, whoopee!!

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Here’s a look at each of the bird blocks, starting with the cardinals.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Cedar Waxwings are seldom seen here, but once I did see an entire flock of them in a tree at our house. There must have been four or five dozen, a huge flock. This little square brings back that memory.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

This one is a red breasted grosbeak, I haven’t ever seen one of these in real life.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

We have bluebirds here, but I don’t see them often. I bought mealworms for them and DH put them in the feeder, then didn’t see any bluebirds for months!

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

This one is a yellow warbler. I would have loved to get the goldfinches on the fabric, but I couldn’t have them and the cardinals too.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

I think this is supposed to be a purple finch.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

One last look at the finished block.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Laying out the row, I had Block 12 from last time, so the row blocks were ready to assemble.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

Getting closer to the end of this, just four more blocks to go and then sashing.

Be My Neighbor Block 11 at From My Carolina Home

I know I have shared this before, but I was at it again with this block. I use the ends of my longarm bobbins to wind bobbins for the DSM. And I use the ends of bobbins from my DSM as the top thread for scrappy blocks. It helps to use up those bits and ends, and free up bobbins to reload with different colors.

Re-using ends of bobbins at From My Carolina Home

If you are just finding this, all the patterns are available on Bear Creek Quilting’s free pattern area for Moda Be My Neighbor blocks, click HERE for the pattern downloads.  Three rows finished, and I like the lighter colors.  I wish now that I had done all the sky fabrics the same, but oh well, not going to rip it out!!

Be My Neighbor Three Rows Complete at From My Carolina Home

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.

My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.   The pattern steps will remain up until July 2017 then removed and published in my Craftsy store.  See my Craftsy store for more of my scrappy patterns to use up your stash bits. Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.

Are you quilting today?

Sharing

Freemotion by the River

Needle and Thread Thursday

Busy Hands Quilts Finished or Not Friday

Whoop Whoop Friday

 


21 Comments

French Broad River Canoe Trip

The late spring weather has been mild, with cool mornings and evenings. Abundant rain this spring has pulled us out of drought, and brought the level up in the French Broad River. DH had a day off during the week, so we decided to finally take the canoe trip we’ve planned to do for years. It is only a half day of total time, including the drive time up to the facility in Asheville. So, we got tickets online, and made reservations for an early start. Arriving at the waterside, we were given a short instruction on the river hazards, what to avoid, how to go under the three bridges, and interesting things to look for on the way.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Slathering on sunscreen and spritzing a bit of bug spray, we donned our life jackets and boarded the van towing the canoes for the ride out to the launch point. It only took twenty minutes to get there, but would take two and a half hours to come back on the river. We were the only canoe renters that morning, but three other folks went along with their own kayaks. Several canoes were removed from the trailer to make room for their kayaks. They were here on vacation, and we had a nice chat about local restaurants on the way.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Our canoe was unloaded first, and we climbed in and sat down with our paddles at the ready.  A push off by our guide, and we set out on the river.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

About 20 minutes later, we got to the first bridge. Going ‘left of the blue dot’ we easily floated through the archway.  Those little churning areas were no problem, and actually quite pretty in the sun.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Verdant green trees lined the river on both sides as it wound lazily around the countryside. It was so quiet too, just the gentle sound of the water as it flowed, sometimes babbling as it went around boulders or bridges, or trees sticking up on the edge of the shore.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Off the main river, in a side inlet, we found the arched stone bridge.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

In places, the trees overhung the water, so you could stay in the shade a bit.  We came to appreciate these areas as the sun climbed higher in the sky, and the temperature rose with it.  Although it was about 68º F when we started (19º Celsius), it was about 86ºF at the end (30º Celsius).

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Wildlife was abundant in the morning hours. We came around a bend and almost missed this giant turtle sunning himself as he blended with his surroundings quite well. I wasn’t sure the picture was going to be clear, so we turned the canoe around and paddled back to see him again. But when we made the turn, he was gone.  DH was amazed at the length of his tail!  He was huge.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Looking up the hill on the side of the river, a horse pasture with an old barn came into view. We could hear the horses neighing to one another long before we were able to see them. Can you see them? There are at least four at the top of the hill.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

The river took us farther downstream, as we floated without paddling for a bit. Did you know that the French Broad River flows northward?  Originating near the town of Rosman which is near the southern border of North Carolina in Transylvania county, it flows northeast generally, winding around towards Asheville getting larger as it goes north, collecting in smaller rivers.  It flows north east then north west, ending in Tennessee near Knoxville where it joins the Holston River to form the Tennessee River.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

Looking up on the right, we could see the corner of the Biltmore House coming into view. We had been told that it would be visible from the river, and thought this would be it.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

But a little farther on the river, a better view presented itself.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

A couple of families of Canadian Geese were tending to their little ones. So cute, the little golden fluffballs swimming next to the parents on the right couldn’t be more than a couple of weeks old.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

A little farther along, pretty dark birds with a flash of blue were flying low over the water. We think they were after the mayflies and similar insects floating on the surface of the water.  The river stayed about the same width the entire length of our trip, but it gets much bigger after gathering in the Swannanoa River north of where we would end our trip.  The river is 218 miles long, and we only saw a tiny fraction.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

These geese were loudly complaining about the intrusion on their waterway.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

More green on the water, so peaceful and quiet. We didn’t see the kayakers until the end of our journey when they finally caught up to us. We decided to let them go by, and took a bit of a break in the shade.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

One more picture, the river with more mountains in the distance. Such clear colors are seen on this morning, but by now it was after noon and getting a bit hot in the sun in spite of the puffy clouds.  By the way, do you know why it is called the French Broad River?  I had to look it up because I was curious.  There are actually two rivers in North Carolina which were called Broad Rivers, and at the time they were named, this area was held by the French.  So this one became the French Broad River and the other was referred to as the English Broad River.

French Broad River Canoe Trip at From My Carolina Home

At this point, we still had about half an hour to go before getting to the end point where the car was parked. There was one more beautiful bridge with some lovely architectural details, but the camera battery died before I could get it. I guess that means we have to go again. I think this would be stunning in the autumn, but I am also sure that the river is likely pretty crowded then.  Still, if we go at the right time, it could be wonderful.

Have you ever done a canoe trip, or something like it?

 

Sharing

Rattlebridge Farm

 


13 Comments

Scrap Dance Two-Step June

We are getting close to the end, today you’ll see the second block in the design. So grab the units you still have and let’s get started!

Scrap Dance Two-Step Mystery Quilt Along

With the bar units you have left, match one bar element with two scrappy/background HST elements to make this unit. Be very sure that the background HSTs point to the ends and up with the background bar on bottom.

One hint, at this point, you are down to the last bits to assemble.  I laid mine out in overlapping rows to be sure I had the remaining scrappy prints distributed.   Right away I had the same print in two adjoining pieces.

So, I could change them around until the scrappy prints were well distributed between the units.

As you sew, be careful to sew through the little ‘x’ to get those sharp corner points.

Now, let’s Two-Step! Here is the block you’ll make with these units. Note that half the HST/bar units go on the top, and the other half will be turned around and on the bottom. The final block will have all four corner background HSTs pointing to the outside corners as shown here.

Here’s mine.  Note again I laid out the units in rows, and did all of them at once to be sure that the prints were distributed as best as they could be.  There is the opportunity to change them around before sewing if one block ends up with the same print contiguous.  Sew in rows, pressing seams in one direction, either all up or down.

Here is your pdf for your sewing room for June – Scrap Dance Two Step June.  Resist the temptation to finish it up at this point, as we have one more thing to do.  Remember that extra fabric I said to put aside at the beginning?  You’ll need it next month (and it is NOT sashing, so don’t do that), so be sure you have some extra background and a few more scraps for July.  You’ll find out the final mystery step next month!

We’d all love to see your progress as you go forward, please upload your pictures to the Flickr group, and be sure they are public so we can share them.  The group url is https://www.flickr.com/groups/scrapdancemystery2015/ – and I look forward to seeing all your units as they are done.  Any finish of any of the mystery quilt alongs can be shared on this group, even from the original mystery from 2015.  We use the same group for all the annual Scrap Dance mysteries.

Here area a few of the latest shares of the May block finishes. Garden2Fun has wonderful bright batiks!

MayProgress

Mary has a great variety of prints with a pop of red.

Scrap dance two step Part 5

Laura R. is doing a red and white version.

Two Step Scrap Dance--I started this when the mystery quilt started and then life got in the way, but today I was able to catch up!

Laura F has a wonderful variety of prints too.

Two Step Step 5

Love the black background Marsha is using!

12 Block A's

Kristi’s blocks are looking awesome!

These are looking awesome! This mystery is really fun!

And I love the autumn prints Elaine is doing.

Scrap Dance two Step .This quilt says"mine". Thank you Carole.

How’s your Two-Step coming along?

Scrap Dance Two-Step Mystery Quilt Along


14 Comments

Quilting the On-Point Quilt

Quilting this violet and green on-point setting quilt was finished on a rainy afternoon.  Outside is so much green now, and getting more green by the day.  I usually unplug the longarm during thunderstorms as I don’t fully trust the surge protector, but a light gentle rain makes for a cozy day in the basement to sew.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I did have a fix to make on the backing. I picked a big piece of dark green out of the stash, cut it in half and seamed it together  lengthwise to make it wide enough. Unfortunately, there was this little bite out of one edge.  Naturally I didn’t find it until the other side and the rest of this side was pinned to the leaders.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

This is a problem when loading a backing on a longarm. That unsecured edge will allow the backing edge to sag and create an uneven pull across the backing, that might result in puckers or pleats on the back. So, I pinned a bit of fabric in the open space to allow the edge to be secured to the leader. Pinning was enough, I didn’t need to take it off and sew this little patch in.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

So all loaded, and now to do the stand and stare. I was thinking that it would really be special to quilt feather wreaths in the solid purple print squares, and some other freehand motifs in the four patches.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Ultimately I went with a pantograph again.  I had two more quilts in the queue and needed to get this one done and off the frame.  The pantograph has a feather design, and looked nice in the border squares.  I used a darker thread to make the quilting pop in the light areas.  An adjustment to the bobbin tension after this row tightened up the stitches.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Then in the purple print, it made a nice texture.  I used polyester thread on the top in a golden brown, and Bottom Line in the bobbin.  The batting is Warm and Natural.  The pantograph is called Feelin’ Groovy designed by Michelle Wyman and Terri Watson of Heart and Soul Quilts, and sold by Willow Leaf Studio.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The darker thread color shows nicely in the white.  I like the density of this pantograph too.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Finishing up the quilting, the feather design quilts up nicely.

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

Cutting off the excess after the quilting was complete, the dark green had enough left over to make binding.

Quilting On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

And, all done, ready to donate.

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

Now, I just need to decide where it will go. It is lap quilt size, so it could go to either the senior center or the chemo center. It might come down to which friend comes over next, LOL!!

On Point Charity Quilt Finish at From My Carolina Home

I have another QOV to do, and one for a foster care center, both large quilts that will take some time.  Luckily, they both will use pantographs too.  I’ll show those to you soon.

Have you finished a project recently?

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.


23 Comments

On Point Charity Quilt

Sometimes just playing with scraps can produce something useful. Pulling out the scrap bag, I was looking for some pastels and florals to add to my Be My Neighbor fabric pull, when I ran across these half square triangles left over from another project.  These squares are 5-1/2 inches.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I really had no advance idea of what to do with them. Maybe some four patches would be good. So, I cut some 5-1/2-inch white squares to go with them.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Sewing the HSTs to the white squares, pressed to the solid white, the units were nested and chain pieced.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

So, now what. I had six four patch units, each finishing at 10-inches, not enough to make a quilt.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Well, maybe set them on point with large squares to make a decent size. So I pulled out a complementary purple print and cut large 10-1/2-inch squares and some triangles to set the four patches on point.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

All together, it just seemed to call for an interesting border, not just another print.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I did think that a first border of the same purple print would make the four-patch units float in the center, so I added one, 3 inches wide.  Then, I had these 5-inch yellow squares left over from another project, and yellow goes well with purple. I cut the same size squares of the light green, and lay them out to be sure the dimensions would match the border requirement. In a few spots, I sewed the seams a bit larger to take up the excess.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Now it was a good size for a charity quilt, about 45 x 55.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

For continuity, I added a 2-inch final border of the same violet print as the middle HSTs.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I found some backing fabric in dark green, and laid it on the longarm to measure out batting.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

Loading it up, now I had to decide on a pantograph. I wanted something kind of girly with the flowers.

On Point Charity Quilt at From My Carolina Home

I’ll show you the finish next time. Have you ever built a quilt from just bits, letting it evolve as it goes?

See the finish here – Quilting the On Point Quilt

Sharing

Let’s Bee Social

Crazy Mom Quilts

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.