From My Carolina Home

Quilting, cooking, reading books, gardening, crafting, sewing, photography and more


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Quilted Art Project – Part 2

I finally got back to the Quilted Art project, but couldn’t spend a lot of time on it this week.  However, even a little bit of progress each week will, over time, complete the project.  I think I’ll be able to stitch some on it today.  For now, here is where it stands. The last doily was stitched to the base.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Silk ribbon tends to keep the creases from winding on the bobbins, so the ribbons were unwound and ironed to take out the wrinkles.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Starting with a pretty lavendar, three stitches were placed vertically for the top part of an iris flower.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then, three smaller stitches radiating down create the lower part of the flower.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I marked three spots, 3/4-inch high for three irises.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I haven’t decided whether or not to do stems, or just more flowers – more irises or stop with three.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I marked a cornucopia shape with chalk to loosely define a path for the trims, buttons and other things I plan to add. I put a straight line on the lower left for a purple trim piece, and scattered some buttons below it.

Quilted Hoop Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I’ll be doing more embellishing today, but so far I am pretty pleased with the way it is going.

Are you slow stitching?

Linking up with Kathy at Slow Stitching Sunday.

Slow Sunday Stitching

Stitching Doilies ~ From My Carolina Home

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Loading the Longarm

A lovely group of ladies in town make larger quilts every year to give all at once to a deserving charity.  This year they are making twin size quilts for Mainstay, the local women’s shelter.   It is difficult to quilt that size on a DSM, so I have agreed to do the quilting on six of their quilts.  I have already done one, and three more have been delivered.  I thought this would be a good time to talk about what it takes to get a quilt on the longarm frame, and why we need certain things.  I may do this differently than some, but most people I know do it basically this way.  This one was the first I did a few weeks ago.  It was beautifully pieced and the borders were flat as pancakes!

Charity Basket Quilt at From My Carolina Home

The next quilt had a few issues. The first thing to know is that from the time I pick up the top in my hands, to the time that it is ready to begin quilting takes roughly an hour, and sometimes more if I have to deal with a problem. I start by inspecting the top and backing. I sometimes find this – uneven edges. These have to be cut to even, or the tension will be off where the edge is dangling.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

So I line it up and cut that bit off.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Determining where the middle seam is, I plan to load it with the seam parallel to the rollers. I fold the backing in half, and line up the halfway point to the halfway mark on my leaders, and start pinning.  The backing is loaded right side down.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Using long corsage pins, I put one every two to three inches. Some quilters use snap on thingys, or zippers, but I don’t have those.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Running the backing under the upper bar, I then pin the other edge to the front leader using the same pins, lining up the middle to the mark on that side. This helps keep the backing straight and on line.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Once it is fully pinned, I look to see if it is hanging straight, not pulling to one side or the other. If it is, then it is off grain, and I can repin with some adjustments to compensate. Luckily, this one looks good.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Now, I roll up the backing on the front bar, smoothing it with my hands as I go, keeping it straight.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

When I reach the seam, if it comes over the bar in line, then I am doing good. If not, I unroll it and start over.  This seam is really too thin for a backing, only 1/4 inch.  It should be at least an inch wide and pressed open.  This may come apart during quilting, and the bulk will be all on one side instead of distributed.  If it was a nice wide seam, I would press it open, but since it is small I’ll leave it as is in case a thread breaks.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Have you ever wondered why you need to provide backing that is 8 inches longer and wider than your top? Here is why. The needle plate and the clamp take up space. Less than four inches means the base may contact the clamp and cause a jiggle or boo-boo in the quilting line.  It startles the quilter to hit the clamp, and may also cause broken threads or a broken needle, which will require the quilter to stop to fix those issues.  You need two inches for the base, and an inch for the clamp, and an inch for clearance.  You’ll need even more if the quilt is to have ruler work which requires a larger base to be added.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Now I need to measure and cut the batting. I usually use the longarm to hold the roll, and lay the top on top of that so I know how much to cut.  I’d like to acknowledge the wonderful support of The Warm Company, who generously provided the batting for these charity quilts for us.  They have a warehouse distribution center near here.  I like Warm and Natural,  and Warm and White, always good quality batting and a joy to quilt.  This roll is 90 inches wide, which means I just need to cut the width of the top plus 8 inches.  While I have the top spread out, I’ll look for stray pins and threads to take care of before loading.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

I raise the upper bar, and place the batting needled side up on the backing. I need to get it placed right and straight, then smooth it out. I usually put the excess over the bars under the table to keep the batting off the floor.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Placing the top on the batting, I need to get the top edge of the pieced top in a straight line, and be sure it is straight along the sides, perpendicular to the roller bars. Otherwise it will migrate to one side during quilting. I float the top, meaning I don’t pin it to any rollers, I will put a line of stitching at the top to hold that down, then use the upper bar for tension to keep it straight.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Uh oh, looks like this quilter used the slap and sew method of border attachment.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

See the excess fullness?

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

I get the iron out, and warm it up. I try to steam out some of that fullness while it is on the frame before the quilting starts. Sometimes it will take out a little, but there is no substitute for correct sewing of a border. See my tutorial on this under quilting basics at the top of the blog. Not all the fullness came out with steaming. Batiks are really bad about this, you cannot steam them into shape like quilting cottons.  But that is their appeal, not shrinking, isn’t it?  All the more reason to measure borders and cut them to length.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

There is some fullness in the blocks too due to bias edges, but not as much. I hope the quilting will disguise this.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

Here’s another telltale sign that the borders are too big. When the top is folded up, lining the edge of the border up with the edge of the roller, the middle of the fold will bow upward like this one, indicating that the middle of the quilt is smaller than the edges. I am going to have a bit of a problem with this quilt, but will just do the best I can.  The borders are at least 2 inches longer than the quilt top, and the left side is longer than the right. Please use the proper method for measuring and adding borders, not the slap and sew method. It saves a lot of headaches and heartaches, both for you and for your quilter.

Loading the Longarm | From My Carolina Home

After all this, I still have to wind some bobbins, chose a pantograph and lay it out, thread the machine, change the needle, and do a test for stitching integrity.   I may have to adjust tensions to get the stitches balanced.  Then I’ll be ready to quilt.  I hope this helps your understanding of longarm prep and some of the problems we face.  Let me tell you, nothing is more joyous to work on than a perfectly flat quilt top with properly applied borders, a hefty backing seam pressed open, and zero stray threads or pins.

I have several tutorials on preparing your quilt for longarm quilting with more explanations, proper application of borders and understanding why it should be done the right way, and more.  See the links at the top of this blog for Quilt Basics Tutorials, and How to Prepare for Longarm Quilting.

Do you send your quilts to a longarm quilter? Or do you quilt them yourself?

 

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Catching up on Book Reviews

In the last two months, I have caught up with several good books from three good authors, and one in the not so much category.  In each case, I picked up new titles, at least new to me, from authors I have enjoyed in the past.  I have already put abbreviated reviews on Goodreads for a few of these, but I’d like to share them with you.

Book Reviews on From My Carolina Home

First, Linda Francis Lee wrote a book I found years ago, and it is one of the funniest books I have ever read.  It is called The Devil in the Junior League.  A woman in the upper crust of Junior League society is abandoned by her husband taking all the money with him.  The only way she can afford a lawyer is to hire the flashy, new money lawyer who moved into her neighborhood with the payment plan of getting his tacky, stiletto wearing, gum chewing, wife into the Junior League.  What follows is a Pygmalion story that is just hilarious. This is truly one of the funniest books I have ever read. It made me laugh out loud on an airplane, and also while I was reading and trying to be quiet in a hospital ICU! Something that can make you laugh when you are worried is a treasure indeed. The story piles more laughs on page after page, as the situation just becomes more convoluted, and thus more comical. It is a light read, a great beach read, or perfect for anytime you want to escape into a Southern farce.

Book Reviews on From My Carolina Home

When I saw the new book by Linda Francis Lee called The Glass Kitchen, I had to grab it up at the library sale.  The book has a delightful premise, where a woman gets visions of foods that lead to information in her life, directions to go, how to find her sister, and more. Moving to New York after a disastrous divorce, she has to relearn how to let the visions in again, and in so doing, find her own way. I enjoyed the book, although I think it bogged down in the middle a bit with the predictable love affair, but managed to save itself in the conclusion. Like the other book by this author, the heroine is pushed around by the men in her life, and eventually comes into her own, finally accepting herself and standing up for what she wants. Another very enjoyable read, with a twist on the usual story.

Book Reviews on From My Carolina Home

Another favorite author, Jeffrey Archer writes wonderful stories set in England.  His novels are about family and political power, legal themes and epic tales.  His series called the Clifton Chronicles is a well paced story in an easy reading style. In the first novel, Only Time Will Tell, Harry Clifton is introduced to the reader and grows up without knowing who he really is. His life in school, and the shaping of his character are explored with a cliffhanger ending that will make you race to get the next in the series. The Sins of the Father continues the story of Harry Clifton, beginning with his mistaken sentence for murder when he takes the identity of a dead shipmate. The tale proceeds in Archer’s trademark easy to read style, and compelling, page-turning storyline. Machinations of lawyers, and the second World War intervene to delay Harry’s progress to his goal of proving he is not the son of a British baron. Emma finds out the secret, and spends over a year trying to track down Harry and right some of the wrongs.

Book Reviews on From My Carolina Home

The third novel in the series is Best Kept Secret.  Harry and Emma’s son Sebastian grows up, and they adopt a sister for him.   Giles, Emma’s brother, gets engaged and his fiancee is not what the family would want. Marrying Virginia anyway, Giles has to deal with the fallout, especially when his mother passes and leaves a new will.  Virginia is not one to go down without a fight, and sets in motion a plan to exact revenge on those who she feels wronged her.  I enjoyed this one on audio, listening in the car on my way to and from work, and while doing errands.  It is much more interesting to do this than to listen to all the noise and commercials on the limited radio stations I can hear in these mountains.  There are three more books in this series, and I’ll get to them soon.

The third author is Erica Bauermeister who wrote The School of Essential Ingredients that I read last year.  An uncommon story, this book is a very interesting character study.  Lillian runs a cooking school on Monday nights, and the book explores the people in the class and how they interact with each other.  The food seems to bring about feelings that in some cases have to be shared.  It doesn’t have an earth-shattering plot, but is the kind of book to be read slowly and savoured. The descriptions of people, places, and particularly the food transport the reader to a magical slowing down of daily life, to live in the moment. The point is to derive pleasure in ordinary tasks, to trust yourself and be happy. This one is a keeper to be read again and again.

Book Reviews on From My Carolina Home

I was happily surprised to find she had written a sequel to the story called The Lost Art of Mixing.  This story is mostly a character study of several ordinary lives with trials and tribulations, ultimately savouring the day to day, the little joys, and small accomplishments that make up most of our lives.  Some of the characters from the first book in the series have created new relationships, and Lillian finds herself in a situation that will require delicate handling and a great deal of thought.  The exploration of each character in their view of the world, shaped by their experiences is a delightful journey.  Sometimes, the least little thing will bring to the surface buried feelings and resentments, but can also bring a resolution to a conflict not acknowledged up to then.

The disappointment was Diane Setterfield. While I enjoyed her Thirteenth Tale immensely, the next novel she published was a meh, not so much.  In The Thirteenth Tale, a reclusive author, Vida Winter, decides to tell her true-life story to an unknown writer after decades of making up stories about herself. She is haunted by a request to ‘tell the truth’, along with some disturbing memories. She tells her story to Margaret Lea who has her own pain connected with a family secret. This secret is similar to the secret Ms. Winter has to reveal and impacts Margaret in a way she doesn’t expect, impacting her decision to do the biography.

Book Reviews on From My Carolina Home

The story unfolds slowly, but builds on itself becoming more complex as it progresses. It completely drew me in as it went forward, making the book harder and harder to put down. The present day is woven into the tale as Margaret tries to verify some of the details, as when she finds the original house where Ms. Winter lived. There are several twists and turns, and you won’t see them coming. I am pretty good at figuring out how plots will progress, but this one surprised me more than once. Just when you think you know, there is something more that changes everything. Books play an important role in this novel, always a delightful discovery. The book is written from the point of view of Margaret, who is the daughter of a rare bookseller. Gardens and architecture provide interesting backdrops for the before and after aspects of the story.

Given the success of that novel, you would think that a book billed as a “perfect ghost story, beautifully and irresistibly written” would be a good one. NOT! I found Bellman & Black to be a disappointing, flat, dull story. Spoiler alert, although you won’t care as you shouldn’t waste your time or money on this book. I see what Setterfield was going for, the arc of a stone thrown at a rook (a black bird) by the young protagonist is a forecast of the story of Bellman’s life as he reaches higher and higher for more wealth and more business, before his decline. As death comes to those around him, he seizes the opportunity to profit from it, yet it still claims him as it does all who live. The story, however, never takes off into the promised intrigue of the cover. Would you call selling mourning clothing as a “deadly, macabre business”? I wouldn’t. I didn’t care about the character, and never felt the story really come together.

Now, I have to decide which book to read next out of the more than 200 on my To Be Read pile.  Here are a few of my choices.

Books TBR 1

Perhaps one from the stack above? See anything you’d like to read with me? How about these?

Books TBR 2

Or this one? See anything you have read and can recommend?  Most of these I got on recommendations from friends, although a few are authors I read again and again.  Actually, a few of these I have already put in the donation pile, as part of the book clean-out that I promised DH.  You know, once you’ve read three or four John Grishams, or Catherine Coulters, or Robert Ludlums, you’ve read them all.  So, cleaning out, I gave those to Books for Good.

Books TBR 4

Decisions, decisions, though, on what’s left!  Anne McCaffrey?  Jennifer Chiaverini? The latest Marie Bostwick? Anita Shreeve or P.D. James?  A new author?

What are you reading?

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More Fidget Quilts for Alzheimer and Dementia Patients

A few weeks ago, I received a stuffed package of trims, zippers, patches, and other things from Rosemary in Virginia to assist our quilt club with our Alzheimer quilts project. In return, I promised to make her two Alzheimer quilts for her local group to see how to do them.  I finally got them finished, and shipped them off!

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

I began by quilting two pieces of fabric 18×24 inches. I used the same fabric front and back. The quilting was simple loops.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

The second piece was put on the same backing piece with at least 3 inches between.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

After quilting, I cut apart the pieces. I trimmed the backing/batting to 1-1/2 inches all around.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Then, I folded the 1-1/2 inches of backing overage to the back along the seam line…

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

and cut away the excess batting.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Fold the backing raw edge to the edge of the quilt…

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

then over again to cover the raw edge to form the binding on one side.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Fold the corner at a 90-degree angle to the quilt.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Then fold the next side’s fabric in half, meeting the raw edge to the edge of the quilt.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Fold over again to cover the raw edge, forming a perfect mitered corner.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Put pins in to secure all the corners and top-stitch along the edge of the binding.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Two bases done and ready to add the fidget items.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Rosemary sent all kinds of things to play with. Interesting items you have no other use for can be recycled into something very useful.  Colors you might not use are perfect here, like an orange zipper.  Bits of this and that can be put to good use rather than thrown away. I picked out this heavy zipper first, and placed it diagonally on the top, stitching it down on both side and each end.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

A patch makes a wonderful texture to rub fingers on.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Alzheimer patients tend to like velcro, so I used the pieces Rosemary sent on large grosgrain ribbons. I stitched one side down to the topper.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

And then added the other side held only at one end.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Next, long tails of picot trim were added to the zipper pulls to make them easy to grasp, and add another element to play with.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

I added two more sections of textural ribbon pom-poms. First one done.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

On the second one, I added lace seam binding to the zipper pull. Using a crochet hook makes this easier to thread through the small hole.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

I stitched these tennis racket appliques onto a soft flannel pocket form, then stitched it to the quilt.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

There was still some of the rainbow trim left, and I liked the gathering on it. This time I stitched two lengths of it down side by side with the gathers going in opposite directions.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

This one got a velcro strip too.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

I made a ribbon flower from a pretty ribbon trim, and added a button to the center.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

This cute little patch was stitched down too.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

Second one done.

Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

If you want to do this with your quilt club, be sure you ask at the facility first to be sure you provide what they need. Our local club makes these for two facilities, both with very different rules. You may find that at some facilities buttons are allowed, but not in others.  In most cases, the items on the quilt need to be able to stand washing in hot water and drying in a dryer. Plastic that might melt isn’t a good idea.  In some facilities, each resident will be given the fidget quilt for their use alone, so they wouldn’t get washed that often. In others, all fidget quilts might be washed frequently, and the recipients receive different ones each time they are brought out. Just check first, so there are no misunderstandings.  I am happy to support this worthy cause, and find a way to use some things that would otherwise get donated or thrown away.  You can see the other Alzheimer quilts I made last year HERE.

My blog is a variety of subjects, quilting and sewing, tablescapes and recipes, book reviews and hand stitching, crafting and mountain living. I love to have new followers, too!  See the buttons on the sidebar to follow by your favorite method.  If you are visiting from Fave Quilts, Pinterest, a blog hop or link up, please stay a bit and have a look around, my tutorials are gathered at the top in pages to make them easy to find.  Lots of fun is had here, and I invite you to follow with any of your favorite methods, see the sidebar for ways to follow.  My third mystery quilt is in progress, click on Scrap Dance Two Step on the sidebar for the first post.  Click on the Home page to see the latest posts on the blog.

How do you recycle bits and pieces?

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Alzheimer Fidget Quilts | From My Carolina Home

 


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An Early Spring?

Mountain living in winter is usually not the time to see a lot of wildlife, so imagine my surprise in the middle of winter to see this sight in our lower meadow! A sizable flock of robins was stopping by for a visit.  Get ready for a picture heavy post with lots of wildlife.

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

Usually a harbinger of spring, I have never seen this many in winter.

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

They refused to line up and smile for the camera, but there were at least 16 – 20 of them.

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

One even pulled a worm out of the ground while I was getting the focus on the camera!

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

These were taken at the end of January, when there was still a bit of snow yet to melt.  They were back on Saturday and Sunday too, looking for seeds and bugs to eat.

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

They poked around for quite a while. Most found something to eat while they visited.

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

Since the groundhog (also known as a woodchuck) didn’t see his shadow on Groundhog Day, we have been wondering if that with the robins meant truly an early spring.   A couple of days after the official day, I caught our own local groundhog as he scampered across the lower meadow.

An Early Spring? ~ From My Carolina Home

Just before the snow, the deer came by. There were three adults and a juvenile.

Deer January 2016 ~ From My Carolina Home

I love my new camera, the zoom lens really gets some good, close shots.

Deer January 2016 ~ From My Carolina Home

As skittish as these deer are, these are the best shots I have ever been able to take of them.  They were at least 50 yards away from me.

Deer January 2016 ~ From My Carolina Home

Just this past week, a few Northern Flickers stopped by to get a nibble of seed.

Northern Flicker ~ From My Carolina Home

There were four of them visiting this day.

Northern Flicker ~ From My Carolina Home

They like to peck in the ground to find food.

Northern Flicker ~ From My Carolina Home

They are really pretty to see, spots and stripes, a bit of red and a bit of black.

Northern Flicker ~ From My Carolina Home

On the gardening front, the amaryllis is making progress. The leaves came up, then just a hint of a flower bud.

Amaryllis Third Year Bloom ~ From My Carolina Home

About 10 days later, and the flower is making good progress. I hope it will bloom in March.  It is exciting as this will be the third year that the bulb has produced a bloom.  The flowers are deep red.

Amaryllis Third Year Bloom ~ From My Carolina Home

How about you, ready for spring to arrive, or happy with winter a bit longer?

 

 

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Quilted Art Project

This project will be a Slow Stitching project over the next few weeks.  Today, I’ll show the overall plan, and will update as I get farther along.  Someone asked me recently how many projects I have going on at any one time, and the answer is usually two or three.  I’ll have something next to my chair to fiddle with while watching TV, a quilt on the longarm to quilt, and a project on the sewing table.  Right now, I have two at the sewing table, as I am still making units for Scrap Dance Tango, and I am starting another charity quilt.  I have a lovely stained glass quilt on the longarm, and two more charity quilts in the queue. This project has made it up to the hand work stage.  I started with these lovely fabrics.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I like the purple and green. This will go in the sewing room when I am done. Isn’t this a cute sewing print?

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then I brought out some lace doilies and pieces.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Rummaging through the button boxes….

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I pulled out purple, green, white, and yellow buttons. I had some pearls, large beads and flowers I could use too.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then I dug into the silk ribbon box…

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

and found some appropriate colors there too.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Next, the seed bead stash.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

The finished art piece will be mounted in a giant quilting frame. After sewing the three pieces of fabric together, I marked the outline of the hoop to define the art space.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I loaded it onto the longarm, and auditioned various colors of thread.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Then, it was quilted with a pansy pantograph.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

Ultimately, I just quilted the whole piece instead of just the part inside my chalked outline.

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I decided on these three doilies, can you believe I have a purple one?

Quilted Wall Art Project ~ From My Carolina Home

I pinned them down, and began the hand stitching to secure all three in place.

Stitching Doilies ~ From My Carolina Home

The first two are done, and I have the third one to go.

Stitching Doilies ~ From My Carolina Home

Next up will be to start placing buttons, beads, and silk ribbon embroidery. I am going to let this evolve as it will, no real plan right now.  Linking up with Slow Stitching Sunday last fall was very motivating to get the ornaments done.   I plan to do it again, in the hope this will be the same, making progress of some kind each week.

It is cold now, and I wouldn’t mind one more snow to keep me home sewing for a day. If you are in the mood for a new print, click on My Etsy Store, I have just added some new fabrics from my trip last Friday.  I found a couple of really cute sewing prints I loved, but had to buy the whole bolt.  I am selling the extra yardage to my readers at a discount over retail.  Look for some new projects using these prints soon.  I am also selling some of my quilting library on this post – HERE.

Do you work on intricate projects over time?

 

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Valentine Projects

I have been so involved with the mystery quilt, finishing some charity quilts, and a quilted art project I’ll be sharing soon, that I haven’t done anything new for Valentine’s Day this year.  I did bring out the wall hangings and decorations, and I’ll give you some links to where these were done last year and the year before.  Just click on the blue titles to open up a new tab with more information, detailed instructions or recipes.  First up, my Hearts Around Table Topper went on the table.

Hearts Around -42

This is so easy to make, with some scrappy red squares and HSTs. Here is the pattern. Just make four blocks with sashing and cornerstones.

Hearts Around

I set the breakfast table with my pink depression glass dishes in the Cherryblossom pattern for a Valentine Tablescape.

Valentine Tablescape 13

Valentine Breakfast on a Sunday morning this year is a perfect day for my Popovers with Black Cherry Creme.

Popovers 22

Popovers 28

There is still time to stamp and mail some Valentine Cards.

Valentine Cards 2015 - 4

Valentine Cards 2015 - 7

I hung my Valentine Wall Hanging.  This is the same block as above, sashed in just white without cornerstones, and bordered with two red prints.

Hearttabletopper

That post also shows this table topper.

Hearttabledecor.jpg

If you like to read Valentine inspired cozy mysteries, A Cozy Valentine has some book reviews to read while enjoying Chocolate Covered Oreos.

Chocolate Covered Oreos 17

I put out the Wool Work Valentine Penny Rug with its Heart embellished Candle.

finishedtwo

I hope you enjoy these posts.  I’ll be getting some cards stamped, to go with these little Valentine buckets.  I planted petunia seeds in them to give to the ladies at the office.  I’ve been setting them in the sun each day in the hope that they will sprout before I take them in.

Valentine pots ~ From My Carolina Home

What are your plans for Valentines?

 

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