From My Carolina Home

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Last of the Garden

The days are not quite so hot, and the nights are definitely getting cooler, so the garden is winding down.  The torenias will continue to bloom well into October, but they are starting to look a little leggy.  The silver pot on the porch below is the amaryllis that rebloomed last winter.  Click on Reblooming Amaryllis to see that post.

Late August Garden - torenia

I was delighted that my heirloom tomato plant gave me at least a couple of small tomatoes before giving up.

Late August Garden - tomatoes

The little pink strawflowers finally bloomed, just one flower per plant, next to the basil that is still going good. I’ll pick all those basil leaves and freeze them for use all winter. That is after I enjoy some fresh ones with the heirloom tomatoes and some mozzarella cheese.

Late August Garden - pink flower, basil

The marigolds have kept the bugs off those little tomatoes, but they are just about done too.

Late August Garden - marigolds

Here are the last few geranium blooms.

Late August Garden - begonia

Impatiens are still going, but the cooler nights will soon take care of them.

Late August Garden - impatiens

These little petunias have bloomed all summer, but the plants stayed small.

Late August Garden - petunia

The variegated coleus finally got tall, and the begonias filled out a bit. They will last a while longer too.

Late August Garden - variegated green

Yellow torenias still spill over their planter.

Late August Garden - yellow torenia

Lovely cool mornings, with a cup of hot coffee, quietly beginning the day in the rocking chair looking at the late summer view.

Late August Garden - rockers

Looks like this photo I took last year, the clouds were prettier than the plain sky this morning.

JuneEvening2

Care to sit a spell? Is your garden still going?

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20 Comments

Meeting a Charity Quilting Goal

One thing about quilting for charity is the need never ends.  There are so many worthy causes to give to, and it gets hard to decide what to do next.  It has been pointed out several times that the most difficult quilts to get donated are the ones suitable for an older boy.  It is easy to do toddler prints, and girlie stuff.  But there are older boys on the list too, often overlooked.  So, that is my focus for the next couple of quilts.  I am going to do larger ones suitable for an older boy, or young man.

Boy's D9P Quilt

My biggest problem with that is in fabric.  My stash is heavy Thimbleberries, florals and darks, lots of autumn colors, much too adult for my purposes, or too girlie.  These fabrics were more generic, just some dots and swirls.

There was only enough blue for the center patch, so I cut 12. I cut 24 gold ones for either side and sewed those rows. They are five inch squares.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Ok, you know I usually show you my boo-boos. Here’s another. When I got to the end I was one short, yet I knew I had cut the right number. Get out the ripper, I sewed two golds to one blue. Ugh!!

Boy's D9P Quilt

Got that straightened out, and completed the center rows for the blocks.

Boy's D9P Quilt

The gold and brown rows went much faster, as I could sew entire width of fabric in rows. I used 5 inch wide strips.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Then I cut the sections into five inch strips.

Boy's D9P Quilt

I pressed all toward the gold so I had nicely nesting seams.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Here is the nine-patch block.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Cut and turned in the usual manner.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Sewn one at a time. I tend to get wonky blocks if I try to chain piece at this stage.

Boy's D9P Quilt

The blocks were sewn into four groups of three blocks.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Then the rows were sewn together. And now, a decision to be made.

Boy's D9P Quilt

I don’t have enough of the blue with the dots left to do a border. I do have these other blues.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Neither one is an exact match for color. I also have enough of the brown, but I think that would be too much brown.

Boy's D9P Quilt

Which do you like?

See part 2 here.


9 Comments

How to Add a Hanging Sleeve for Showing Quilts

It seems like all I have been sewing lately are hanging sleeves for quilt shows.  I have a quilt in the FBC Memory Makers quilt show during the Apple Festival  and the State Fair is right around the corner!  Plus I am going to enter three quilts into the Asheville Guild show, and those have to have sleeves too.  For my Falling Stars quilt, the sleeve will be a temporary one, as I’ll remove it later for using the quilt. The Farmer’s Market Picnic will also get a temporary sleeve.  The wall hanging quilts will get permanent ones. I thought you’d like to see a couple of tips on doing hanging sleeves, both temporary and permanent.  One thing to know, this is mostly hand work, labor intensive, but not difficult.  I can whip stitch one of these on a large quilt in an evening.  For temporary sleeves, the stitches don’t have to be perfect.  They can be fairly far apart, just don’t go through the quilt to the front with your stitching, catch only the sleeve and into the batting layer.

Adding a Temporary Sleeve to a quilt for showing

Tip 1 -I have a sleeve I have used over and over.  The judges do not consider sleeves as part of the judging (at least around here at the fair they don’t).  At the fair, if your quilt doesn’t already have one, the committee will add one for you with safety pins that is only a single layer on the outside, with the rod touching the quilt.  The sleeve I use was made some years ago.  It gets put on and removed over and over.  I don’t make it the exact size each time, I simply fold the excess back over itself with the excess on the outside. This way it can be whatever size I need each time, and inserting the rod doesn’t catch the loose edge.

Adding a Temporary Sleeve to a quilt for showing

Tip 2 – press the sleeve before you add it to the quilt, with the seam running down the middle of the side you will have against the quilt. You will then have a line to push up about 1/4-1/2 inch when stitching the bottom of the sleeve to the quilt. This will give some room for the rod, so your quilt hangs straight.

Adding a Temporary Sleeve to a quilt for showing

Tip 3 – Pin the edge against the quilt where the rod is inserted, and sew it down.

Adding a Temporary Sleeve to a quilt for showing

This will keep the rod inside the sleeve and protect your quilt back from damage.

Adding a Temporary Sleeve to a quilt for showing

All done, just remove any leftover pins and you are ready to deliver it to the show.

Adding a Temporary Sleeve to a quilt for showing

Tip 4 – For a permanent sleeve, you’ll want to be a bit more precise.  Measure your sleeve length by measuring the total width of the quilt including the binding.  Don’t worry, it won’t reach the edge when we are done.  Cut a piece of fabric the length you need by the finished width you need x2 plus one inch.  For example, my quilt is 31 inches wide and my sleeve needs to be 4-1/2 inches finished.  So I cut a piece of fabric 31 inches x 10 inches.  Place WRONG sides together, and sew a seam the length of the strip with a 1/2 inch seam allowance.

Adding a hanging sleeve to a quilt for show

Press the seam open on the outside, placing it down the middle of the sleeve.

Adding a hanging sleeve to a quilt for show

Turn the edges twice to the outside, covering the raw edge of the seam.

Adding a hanging sleeve to a quilt for show
Stitch the hem through all the layers.

Adding a hanging sleeve to a quilt for show

Press, then push up the bottom edge 1/4 inch from the pressed line and press again. This gives the little bit of play that you need for hanging nicely.

Adding a hanging sleeve to a quilt for show

Pin onto the quilt with the exposed seam against the quilt.  The sleeve should end before the binding edge so it won’t be seen when the quilt is hung.  Sew into place by hand with a whip stitch, taking care to sew down the edge against the quilt. The sleeve now appears completely finished with no raw edges showing.  This is my Amazing Value Play quilt.  I’ll finish the hand stitching while watching some football.  Yes, I am a football junkie!!

Adding a hanging sleeve to a quilt for show

When the show is over, clip a thread and begin pulling the sleeve away from the quilt. The hand stitches will easily release, giving you long threads you can clip near the quilt back and pull out.

Removing temporary sleeve - Tutorial on Quilt Hanging Sleeves

Tip 5 – if you know you are going to add a permanent sleeve to your quilt, put the top of the sleeve on the quilt with your sewing machine close to the edge before adding the binding.  The binding will hide that seam line and it will save you quite a bit of hand work.

Are you showing your quilts anywhere this year?  Do you use temporary or permanent sleeves on your quilts?

My blog is about a variety of topics, quilting and sewing, crafting and cooking, reading and travel, mountain living and gardening, and more.  You can follow my blog in several ways, see the sidebar for email sign up or blog-reader links.  I have lots of free patterns for quilters, mystery quilt alongs, holiday quilt alongs, and seasonal events with giveaways.  Please follow me for all the fun!  New projects coming up!!

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Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

I know I promised this recipe some time ago, and I am finally getting around to posting it.  It goes great with my Panko Crusted Deviled Turkey, or the Butterflied Chicken, or even just a simple slice of ham.  Actually, they are great with just about any entree.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Best of all, they are easy, and preparation only takes about 20 minutes total.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Start with some new potatoes, I use two per person if they are average size.  I’ll eat one and DH will have three.  There are rarely any leftovers when these are on the table, no matter how many I cook.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Cut them into quarters.  I cut once horizontally and once vertically for a fat quarter (but not the fabric kind, LOL!!)

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Place in a deep pot, and cover with water. Add about 1/2 teaspoon of salt.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Bring to a boil, and boil for 5-7 minutes, or until a fork easily goes through the potato. Drain in a colander.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Now, here is all you need for the delicious sauce.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Return the potatoes to the warm pan, and add the butter.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Then add the sour cream and parsley.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Stir together in the warm pot. The potatoes will let go of some of their starch, thickening the sauce and coating the potatoes. Add salt and pepper to taste. I like sea salt and cracked black pepper. It is great with smoked salt too.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

If you have fresh parsley in your garden, it is wonderful on these potatoes.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Just scrape the leaves off the stems and chop.

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

4-5 New Potatoes cut into quarters
Water
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons sour cream (I use light sour cream)
2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley or 1 tablespoon dried parsley
Salt and pepper to taste (try a smoked salt on this, yum!)

Quarter the potatoes, place in a pot and cover with water. Bring to a boil, and boil for 5-7 minutes, or until potatoes pierce easily with a fork. Drain in a colander. Return potatoes to the pot. While pot is still warm, add butter, sour cream and parsley. Gently stir until blended and thickened. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Serve and enjoy!

Parsley New Potatoes with Sour Cream Sauce

 

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Book Review – The Violets of March

This is a wonderful story, with an interesting premise.  Emily’s marriage is over.  Joel is moving on with someone new, so she decides to visit her aunt on Bainbridge Island in Washington state.  It is the perfect getaway, putting an entire country between Emily and New York to begin healing her broken heart.  The descriptions of the sea and the beach makes the you want to take off your shoes and wiggle your toes in the sand.  While there, she finds a diary that tells an intriguing story.

Violets of March 4

I thought I’d show a small part of my violet ceramics collection while we talk about this intriguing novel.

Violets of March 3

In some ways, Emily finds the diary’s story a parallel to her own troubles, but it begins to give her more questions than answers.  She realizes the story is written by a relative, and when the diary entries end abruptly, she decides to see if research can provide a clue to what happened.  She is able to work out the identity of one of the characters in the diary, but everyone is determined to keep her from discovering the truth, including her own mother.

Violets of March 1

The writing was believable, and enjoyable.   It is a fairly easy reading, plot driven novel with well developed characters.  The mystery was different, not the usual, and had a historical view that was interesting. I liked this book, and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good story.


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Rainy Day Garden and the foxes visit

It has been cooler the past couple of days, and Saturday afternoon brought a nice rain shower.  I had gone out to water the hanging baskets and the plants under the eaves when it started.  There is something wonderful about sitting on the veranda in the rocking chairs while it is raining.  It is a perfect place to read, or just watch the rain, while the fog and clouds cover the valley.

Rainy Garden Day 1

Those New Guinea impatiens continue to be prolific bloomers, keeping the little tables stable for holding a glass of iced tea.

Rainy Garden Day 10

Rainy Garden Day 11

The yellow torenias continue to grow and bloom, and are spilling down over the inverted pots I used to raise the level of their container.

Rainy Garden Day 8<

The lobelias are almost done. The white one has turned brown, while the blue flowered one is still hanging on.

Rainy Garden Day 7

These little purple petunias are still going, even though they usually don’t last this long.

Rainy Garden Day 6

Cooler temps have encouraged the little johnny jump ups to bloom again.

Rainy Garden Day 4

It kept on raining for a while.

Rainy Garden Day 3

I really enjoy a gray day.  Look how huge the torenia hanging baskets have grown!

Rainy Garden Day 9

The real surprise came early Sunday on a foggy morning. DH noticed the foxes were back, playing in the meadow. He grabbed the camera and got one photo of them. Look between the slats of the railing in the middle, they are both there. One is sitting on the driveway, the other is above at the edge of the meadow standing and looking at the camera.  Amazingly beautiful animals!!

Foxes

Can you see them?

What do you like to do on a rainy day?


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Summer Evening Music, car show, and a fun video

Summer heat is beginning to abate, with some early mornings this week in the high 50s, just like autumn!  It is a great time to get downtown and enjoy another evening of Music on Main with the car club.  This time we took a picnic.  I would have loved to use my Farmer’s Market Picnic quilt, but I have agreed to have it hang in the Apple Festival Quilt Show.  I didn’t want to take a chance of it getting filthy before the show, so left it at home.

PicnicQuiltwithBasket

I wanted to make a special picnic, so I found these crusty rolls at the deli. I added little spinach salads with my Cranberry Vinaigrette, raw carrots, grapes and cheese, and summer sausage.

Summer Evening Music

The sandwiches were peppercorn turkey with horseradish aoli, and fresh lettuce on those crusty rolls. I like to wrap in wax paper to keep the rolls crispy. I put a little sprig of lettuce on the top of mine so I can easily see which one is the larger for DH.

Summer Evening Music

I cheated with the cookies, as I didn’t have time to bake from scratch. I used the break apart and bake chocolate chip cookie dough from the store. One of these days I’ll remember to roll them into dough balls so the square shape of the dough isn’t so obvious, LOL!! Yet, not one person complained, they just grabbed them up and scarfed them down.

Summer Evening Music

Once again, British cars are parked together, so our friends can picnic with us.  We arrived at Music on Main’s car show early enough to have our picnic and see all the cars before the concert started.

Summer Evening Music

All along Main Street in Hendersonville, antique and vintage cars line both sides of the street and down the middle of the road.

Summer Evening Music

Did you want a Mustang when you were younger?

Summer Evening Music

I have a soft spot for these two-tone Bel Air cars. We had a turquoise and cream one when I was a kid.

Summer Evening Music

Summer Evening Music

Summer Evening Music

Lots of people strolling around in the wonderful cool evening, getting ready to enjoy two hours of live music at the Visitor’s Center Bandshell.  Lots of cars from the 1940s came too.  All total there were about 175 cars to see.  If your DH is looking over your shoulder at the cars, there are more pictures on our car club event gallery at HERE.

Summer Evening Music

This is the last Music on Main for the year, and it was a gorgeous evening to be outside. No rain this time!  Tuxedo Junction plays oldies from mostly the 60s and 70s, with a bit of 50s thrown in here and there.

Summer Evening Music

They played until well after dark, and we had a great time.

Summer Evening Music

One more note (pardon the pun) about music.  I recently found the neatest music video.  Have you heard the song Sugar by Maroon 5?  It is one of those fun songs that will stay with you for a bit.  This video is so much fun, I must have watched it a dozen times now.  The members of the group surprised seven brides at their wedding receptions all in the same day, according to the video.  Take a look, and watch the faces of the brides and the audiences.  They were all blown away, and you will be too. Sugar! Yes, Please!